Thanks for the med$

Shortly after Billy Tauzin (R-LA) pushed for the Medicare Prescription Drug Bill that greatly benefitted his benefactors, the pharma industry ($200k+), he began to negotiate with them for a job. The coincidences just pile up, don't they?

Josh Marshall writes:


"a mere two months after the bill passed, PhRMA (the drug industry trade association in Washington) offered to make him their chief lobbyist in a deal that 'would [have been] the biggest deal given to anyone at a trade association,' one source told the Post."
"There was such an outcry over this that Tauzin did the right thing and delayed taking the gig until later in the year."
But my favorite part is when the recent intestinal cancer survivor who was instrumental in making drugs either out of reach or wholly unavailable for many seniors, says: "When you become a patient, you get a sense of how incredibly valuable these medicines are... As I worked through my recovery, I realized that I wanted to work in an industry whose mission is no less than saving and enhancing lives." There is a special place in hell reserved for people like this, and I suspect they play Yanni over the PA... on a loop. (TPM)

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