The costs of marital strife

Researchers at Ohio State have struck yet another blow for domestic harmony with their latest study that shows that even a 30-minute row can slow wound healing by a day:


Levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6), a key immune system chemical that controls wound healing, were also particularly elevated in the hostile couples. High IL-6 levels are linked to long-term inflammation, which in turn is implicated in a range of age-related illnesses, including cardiovascular disease and arthritis.
Researcher Professor Jan Kiecolt-Glaser said: "In our past wound-healing experiments, we looked at more severe stressful events.
"This was just a marital discussion that lasted only a half-hour.
"The fact that even this can bump the healing back an entire day for minor wounds says that wound-healing is a really sensitive process." [BBC]
Though anyone in a marriage that includes yelling at a hospital-ridden spouse likely has bigger problems than just slow healing wounds.

P.S.: I'm at the tail end of a writing deadline which is why the blogging is a little slow right now.

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