Lieberman: Yes, no, maybe so

Joe Lieberman has long served as a part of post-Democrat clique, and now it's time for his culmination: service in the administration of George W. Bush. There's every indication that in fact he will take Rumsfeld's Pentagon post -- the two had breakfast together yesterday, and during his most recent visit to Iraq in late November, Lieberman ramped up his lying about the occupation there to Bush cabinet levels: "Progress is visible and practical," Lieberman wrote in the Wall Street Journal in an atrocious opinion piece (Read Joshua Holland's fine piece that tangles with Lieberman's op-ed).

Lieberman wrote that he was "thrilled" to watch "a vigorous political campaign" in the Sunni triangle, "and a large number of independent television stations and newspapers covering it."


But then came the denials that Lieberman would join the White House gang. His aides spoke of his $3.5 million re-election war chest, and the fact that he has a campaign staff. And Rumsfeld said he had "no plans" to retire.

All this leaves me wondering: Why has Lieberman become such a passionate liar about Iraq if he doesn't want a job with Bush? True, Lieberman has backed the war to the hilt -- it was he who introduced the Iraq resolution back in 2002, and hasn't backed down, but still...

ACLU By ACLUSponsored

Imagine you've forgotten once again the difference between a gorilla and a chimpanzee, so you do a quick Google image search of “gorilla." But instead of finding images of adorable animals, photos of a Black couple pop up.

Is this just a glitch in the algorithm? Or, is Google an ad company, not an information company, that's replicating the discrimination of the world it operates in? How can this discrimination be addressed and who is accountable for it?

“These platforms are encoded with racism," says UCLA professor and best-selling author of Algorithms of Oppression, Dr. Safiya Noble. “The logic is racist and sexist because it would allow for these kinds of false, misleading, kinds of results to come to the fore…There are unfortunately thousands of examples now of harm that comes from algorithmic discrimination."

On At Liberty this week, Dr. Noble joined us to discuss what she calls “algorithmic oppression," and what needs to be done to end this kind of bias and dismantle systemic racism in software, predictive analytics, search platforms, surveillance systems, and other technologies.

What you can do:
Take the pledge: Systemic Equality Agenda
Sign up