Lights on! Just kidding...

Brian Williams reported in his blog that the lights came on in Nawlins for the president, but were quickly doused:
"I am duty-bound to report the talk of the New Orleans warehouse district last night: there was rejoicing (well, there would have been without the curfew, but the few people I saw on the streets were excited) when the power came back on for blocks on end. Kevin Tibbles was positively jubilant on the live update edition of Nightly News that we fed to the West Coast. The mini-mart, long ago cleaned out by looters, was nonetheless bathed in light, including the empty, roped-off gas pumps. The motorcade route through the district was partially lit no more than 30 minutes before POTUS drove through. And yet last night, no more than an hour after the President departed, the lights went out. The entire area was plunged into total darkness again, to audible groans. It's enough to make some of the folks here who witnessed it... jump to certain conclusions."

It's almost like that scene in Airplane! where Johnny unplugs the lights from the runway and says, "Just kidding." Except it's the opposite, and this is a ravaged city fed up with photo ops and press conferences... (Brian Williams via Whiskey Bar)

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