More Roberts-gazing

More bad news for bible-thumpers in Congress on the Roberts front:


Terri Schiavo, the brain-damaged Florida woman whose case provoked Congressional action and a national debate over end-of-life care, became an issue on Tuesday in the Supreme Court confirmation of Judge John G. Roberts Jr. when a Democratic senator pressed him about whether lawmakers should have intervened.
The senator, Ron Wyden of Oregon, said that Judge Roberts, while not addressing the Schiavo case specifically, made clear he was displeased with Congress's effort to force the federal judiciary to overturn a court order withdrawing her feeding tube.
"I asked whether it was constitutional for Congress to intervene in an end-of-life case with a specific remedy," Mr. Wyden said in a telephone interview after the hourlong meeting. "His answer was, 'I am concerned with judicial independence. Congress can prescribe standards, but when Congress starts to act like a court and prescribe particular remedies in particular cases, Congress has overstepped its bounds.' " [LINK]
Though I am a little confused. That's exactly the kind of answer that would upset Democrats who are worried that Roberts wants to roll back congressional authority:
In the first hint of how he will steer the Supreme Court confirmation hearings of Judge John G. Roberts Jr., Senator Arlen Specter, the Judiciary Committee chairman, said Monday that he would press the nominee for his views on specific cases involving the authority of Congress to pass broad social legislation, a power that Democrats fear will be rolled back by a more conservative court.[LINK]
I'd try and figure it out except it makes my head ache -- though that could have something to do with the countless mojitos I consumed last night. So I leave it my much smarter readers to tell me what to think. (And to think I spent six years teaching college kids American Politics 101. How does a bill become a law, anyway?)

P.S.: Given my fragile state, I'm also excusing myself from all NARAL-related blogging.

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