HIGHTOWER: USA Engage

There's an energetic new cheerleader group called: U-S-A ENGAGE!Remember the name, because this perky bunch wants you to know how essential it is for our country to "engage" every other nation in the world, no matter how much we might disapprove of their dictatorial abuses.Upset with the repressive and repugnant military dictatorship of Burma, which stole democracy from its own people and now rules by rape, murder, terror and torture? Don't be upset ... Engage! The Butchers of Beijing turn you off? Hey -- don't criticize -- Engage!Lest you think this is some sappy, left-wing, "We Are the World," feel-good, humanitarian group -- let me call the roll of some of the members of USA ENGAGE: American Express, ARCO, AT&T, BankAmerica, Boeing, Caterpillar, Chase Manhattan, Chrysler ... etc, etc, etc. This one-world pep-group consists of 632 corporate entities that are so determined to "engage" every nation in trade that the group wants to MAKE IT ILLEGAL for your city council or your state legislature to pass any law that would impede business engagements with even the most disgusting governments.For example, several sovereign states, plus 27 counties and cities, have adopted purchasing rules that say they will not buy products from corporations that do business with such inhumane regimes as Burma and China. It's this local and state expression of the people's will that USA ENGAGE wants to outlaw. This corporate coalition claims that only the federal government can make such rules, so it's pushing a bill by Sen. Richard Lugar to crack down on states and cities that pass such sanctions.This is Jim Hightower saying ... To stand-up for state and local rights, tell Sen. Lugar what you think about his bill and USA ENGAGE. Lugar's number is 202-224-4814.For more information:Sen. Richard Lugar: 202-224-4814 to voice objection over this billSource:"Businesses battle state sanctions" by John Maggs. Journal of Commerce: August 8, 1997. "Coalition fights trade sanctions by activist cities, states, counties" by Donna Smith. Reuters: August 24, 1997.

ACLU By ACLUSponsored

Imagine you've forgotten once again the difference between a gorilla and a chimpanzee, so you do a quick Google image search of “gorilla." But instead of finding images of adorable animals, photos of a Black couple pop up.

Is this just a glitch in the algorithm? Or, is Google an ad company, not an information company, that's replicating the discrimination of the world it operates in? How can this discrimination be addressed and who is accountable for it?

“These platforms are encoded with racism," says UCLA professor and best-selling author of Algorithms of Oppression, Dr. Safiya Noble. “The logic is racist and sexist because it would allow for these kinds of false, misleading, kinds of results to come to the fore…There are unfortunately thousands of examples now of harm that comes from algorithmic discrimination."

On At Liberty this week, Dr. Noble joined us to discuss what she calls “algorithmic oppression," and what needs to be done to end this kind of bias and dismantle systemic racism in software, predictive analytics, search platforms, surveillance systems, and other technologies.

What you can do:
Take the pledge: Systemic Equality Agenda
Sign up