Video

Seth Meyers Completely Destroys the Absurd Notion That Clinton and Trump Are Equally Terrible

Hmm, someone who incites violence, scams people and says countless racist, sexist and deplorable things...

Photo Credit: Late Night with Seth Meyers/YouTube

After reviewing the Trump campaign's bizarre blue-state strategies and mocking Paul Ryan for treating Trump like Voldemort, Seth Meyers had some tough talk for voters who might actually believe that Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton are equally terrible. 

Meyers proceeded to outline a list of grievances for each major party's nominee, mainly for voters consumed by the FBI's reinvestigation.

“I mean, do you pick someone who’s under federal investigation for using a private email server?” Meyers asked. “Or do you pick someone who called Mexicans ‘rapists,’ claimed the president was born in Kenya, proposed banning an entire religion from entering the U.S., mocked a disabled reporter…”

But Meyers wasn't finished yet. After all, those Trump offenses were so last year. 

"...said John McCain wasn’t a war hero because he was captured, attacked the parents of a fallen soldier, bragged about committing sexual assault, was accused by 12 women of committing sexual assault, said some of those women weren’t attractive enough for him to sexually assault, said more countries should get nukes, said he would force the military to commit war crimes, said a judge was ‘biased’ because his parents were Mexicans,” Meyers rattled off. 

Of course, there was more:

“…said women should be ‘punished’ for having abortions, incited violence at his rallies, called global warming ‘a hoax perpetrated by the Chinese,’ called for his opponent to be jailed...."

The list goes on and on.

“How do you choose?" he asked finally. "It’s so even.”

Watch:

Alexandra Rosenmann is an AlterNet associate editor. Follow her @alexpreditor.

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