'Triggers Can't Be Unpulled': Black NYT Columnist Fumes When Yale Student Son Is Stopped by Cops at Gunpoint

The chemistry major was coming from the library while black.

Charles Blow
Photo Credit: via YouTube/msnbc

Not even the Yale student son of an award-winning columnist is immune from the barrel of a police officer's gun.

Saturday night, Charles Blow of the New York Times took to Twitter to share the fact that his son was held at gunpoint by a campus police officer searching for a burglary suspect who "fit his description":

The police eventually caught the man they were looking for, but Blow later wrote that he was was still upset at how the officer treated his son: 

Blow writes about racism regularly, so he wasn't shocked that the officers treated his son so harshly. He was more upset that his son could have been another black kid killed by cops simply for being black:

What if my son had panicked under the stress, having never had a gun pointed at him before, and made what the officer considered a “suspicious” movement? Had I come close to losing him? Triggers cannot be unpulled. Bullets cannot be called back.

Yale University has apologized and promised an investigation, but the damage has been done.

So often, people assume that if you do all of the right things—such as earn a college degree from a university like Yale, dress a certain way, use proper speech, hang with certain people, and have the right parents—you can avoid racism, police brutality and overreach. Blow's son was Exhibit A that such thinking is faulty. Whether it's Tamir Rice, Michael Brown, Blow's son or any other black kid, no amount of success can assure their safety. 

"There is no amount of respectability that can bend a gun’s barrel," Blow wrote. "All of our boys are bound together."

Terrell Jermaine Starr is a senior editor at AlterNet. Follow him on Twitter @Russian_Starr.

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