PEEK  
comments_image Comments

Nonpartisan Study Confirms Bush Admin Told 935 Lies About Iraq in March to War

It doesn't sound like "news", since some of us knew this was happening, but The Center for Public Integrity is documenting it for us. And that's news.
 
 
Share
 

Between the L.A. Times and the always-alert OhDave linking me to this, I've got some interesting information for you about BushCo and its web of lies:

President George W. Bush and seven of his administration's top officials, including Vice President Dick Cheney, National Security Adviser Condoleezza Rice, and Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld, made at least 935 false statements in the two years following September 11, 2001, about the national security threat posed by Saddam Hussein's Iraq. Nearly five years after the U.S. invasion of Iraq, an exhaustive examination of the record shows that the statements were part of an orchestrated campaign that effectively galvanized public opinion and, in the process, led the nation to war under decidedly false pretenses.

Okay, maybe it doesn't sound like "news", since some of us knew this was happening, but The Center for Public Integrity is documenting it for us. And that's news.

President Bush, for example, made 232 false statements about weapons of mass destruction in Iraq and another 28 false statements about Iraq's links to Al Qaeda. Secretary of State Powell had the second-highest total in the two-year period, with 244 false statements about weapons of mass destruction in Iraq and 10 about Iraq's links to Al Qaeda. Rumsfeld and Fleischer each made 109 false statements, followed by Wolfowitz (with 85), Rice (with 56), Cheney (with 48), and McClellan (with 14).

This piece, the one I'm quoting from, is very thorough. I'm just giving you a few highlights:

The false statements dramatically increased in August 2002, with congressional consideration of a war resolution, then escalated through the mid-term elections and spiked even higher from January 2003 to the eve of the invasion. [...] For all 935 false statements, including when and where they occurred, go to the search page for this project; the methodology used for this analysis is explained here.

The correlation between the election and the spike is obvious, but when you see this in black and white, well, to me this could spell a prelude to action. Please? Anyone?

GottaLaff is a regular blogger for Cliff Schecter's Blog

 
See more stories tagged with: