News & Politics

DURST: Talk Radio Broken?

Durst writes: "According to 'Talkers' magazine, the trade mag of talk radio, 'politics' doesn't work anymore. Americans apparently tired again of listening to the Washington edition of the Bickersons. I blame Bob Dole. Anybody trying to light a fire off the spark of last year's Presidential election is going to end up flopping around gasping for breath like a guppy on the linoleum floor of a Woolworth's pet aisle. I've seen more exciting hedge trimmings."
According to "Talkers" magazine, the trade mag of talk radio, "politics" doesn't work anymore. Americans apparently tired again of listening to the Washington edition of the Bickersons. I blame Bob Dole. Anybody trying to light a fire off the spark of last year's Presidential election is going to end up flopping around gasping for breath like a guppy on the linoleum floor of a Woolworth's pet aisle. I've seen more exciting hedge trimmings. The most boring election since my third grad social studies teacher rammed Jenny Peterson through as hall monitor on the straight, "Because I said so" ticket. Clinton has to share in the responsibility since he's decided to be this morph like pseudo shape shifter who can assume the position of any poll his staff has in their grubby little hands at the time. Besides having a face made for radio, I too feel the pain of the talk show hosts. I'd rather skip naked through Yankee Stadium with hundred dollar bills duct taped to my body than attempt funny comedy political humor during the second term of a President so smooth and slimy he makes Ronald Reagan look like a velcro tar baby dipped in wallpaper paste. But these guys have to learn to stop their bellyaching, and trust the American public. Knowing the goobers we tend to elect it'll get good and ugly again. Too soon. Will Durst likes it good and ugly.
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