PEEK

Reid -vs- Bush: : Unbalanced Reporting from NPR

Richard Blair: NPR's Melissa Block did an interview yesterday with the Senate Majority Leader - and it was like listening to Fox News...
Late yesterday afternoon, I was listening to an NPR interview between All Things Considered anchor Melissa Block and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid. The interview had been preceded by a pro-regime segment on George Bush standing up to the Democratic bullies in congress as he threatens a veto of any Iraq supplemental funding bill with an attached non-binding timetable for withdrawal, and certification of unit readiness (prior to deployment) that the president can waive.

While I believe that NPR reporting has improved and become more balanced since the time that Bush appointee Ken Tomlinson was unceremoniously chucked overboard at the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, the two stories aligned back to back shows me that even with public radio, we have miles to go. Block's interview with Reid is one reason that, even with Tomlinson long gone, I still will not join or financially support NPR, unless and until their editorial practices change dramatically.

This interview aired before reports were made public of 10 U.S. soldiers and more than 63 Iraqis being killed in Iraq on Monday. The entire transcript of the interview is available here - but almost as important, I think everyone should actually listen to the two segments that I reference: the pro-regime segment, and then the interview with Reid. There are very clear subtleties in the inflection and tone of Block's interview that can't possibly be conveyed by the mere words in black and white.

Right out of the chute, she is almost combative with Harry Reid - you can hear it dripping in her voice...
Richard Blair is the blogmaster of All Spin Zone.
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