The Mix

Wal-Mart cries foul on Greenwald

The corporate giant must be scared: they're claiming filmmaker Robert Greenwald is fringe; Greenwald answers with questions of just who their "mainstream" is.
The conservative squawk machines are at it again, this time coming out of their corner in full swinging support of the king of corporate retail abuse, Wal-Mart.

First slandering the "Higher Expectations Week" being organized by Walmart Watch that over 300 labor unions have joined, the article then goes after Robert Greenwald's upcoming film, "Wal-Mart: The High Cost of Low Price."
"We haven't seen the movie, but by most of the accounts we have heard, it doesn't reflect the view of most Americans," she said. "It seems that his project is better categorized as propaganda than a documentary. If Mr. Greenwald chooses to target millions upon millions of mainstream Wal-Mart shoppers, then he'll continue to find himself on the fringe of society."

Greenwald, a board member of AlterNet's parent group, took a moment to respond on his blog:
So Wal-Mart corporate is using the $3.8 million it spends every day on telling its story to talk about an "expensive campaign" against them. They must be kidding!? I mean talk about spinning and spin doctors.

Christy Gallagher, yet another Wal-mart noisemaker, repeats yet again how "some of their critics have legitimate concerns" and how they want to "partner closely with those folks and work things out."

My question is, which "folks" exactly are they partnering with and working things out? And what exactly have they "worked out"?

How is Wal-Mart deciding which concerns are legitimate?

Do they have a panel that says, yes, this concern about destroying communities, hurting the environment and abusing employees is accurate?

How do I get to testify before the panel based on the year of research, the hundreds of stories from around the world?

Read his whole post here.
Don Hazen is the executive editor of AlterNet.
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