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Bush Iraq invasion provokes bomber violence in London

It has always been an absurd notion that the invasion of Iraq isn't causing violence and terrorism, but rather is preventing it. The proof is in the pudding.
 
 
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It has always been an absurd notion that the invasion of Iraq isn't causing violence and terrorism, but rather is preventing it. This is the giant lie that Bush, Cheney and company have relentlessly peddled since the invasion of Iraq. For anyone paying attention, this Orwellian claim had a couple more nails driven into it in Sunday's New York Times . Near the end of Amy Waldman's long and fascinating article on the evolution of Salafism, the radical form of Islam, and the young men London bombers of Leeds who embraced it, " Seething Unease Shaped British Bombers' Newfound Zeal," she writes: "Their effort to create an Islamic identity in British Muslims has been fueled by the belief that the West is waging a war -- a 'crusade,' the word President Bush used in 2001 -- against Islam, a notion strengthened by the invasion of Iraq."

In a separate article about the capture of one of the failed July 21 London bombers, (" Suspect Held in Italy Said to Admit Carrying Bomb in Train"), Ian Fisher and Alan Cowell reported that the biggest Italian newspaper, Corriere della Sera , reported that the suspected arrested bomber -- called Osman Hussain in Italy and in Britain Hussain Osman, told investigators that, "at a gym in Notting Hill, he met a man named Muktar Ibrahim, who gave him instructions for the bombing. He said the motive was anger over the war in Iraq."

Don Hazen is the executive editor of AlterNet.