Belief  
comments_image Comments

Is the Bible a Threat to National Security?

A military Bible paints war as religious devotion. What could go wrong?

Continued from previous page

 
 
Share
 
 
 

Weinstein responded with one word: "lies." He told Antiwar.com that they were just informed of the letters in June, not in February. Furthermore,  according to MRFF senior research director Chris Rodda, MRFF has obtained documents through Freedom of Information (FOIA) requests that indicated the "AAFES (the Army and Air Force Exchange Service, which runs the BXs, PXs, and other stores on military bases) was clearly concerned about the complaints about the Holman Bibles, with emails as early as June 6, 2011 from AAFES to LifeWay saying that these Bibles had 'become a hot issue,' and referencing and linking to a June 2, 2011 article on MRFF's website as the reason they were becoming a hot issue."

Nevertheless, according to a  Fox News Radio story, LifeWay insists it's "sold" all existing copies of the military Bible in question, and instead is printing the same Bibles with "generic insignias, which continue to sell well and provide spiritual guidance and comfort to those who serve."

The AAFES told Fox News Radio it has 961 copies of the Bible left on shelves at 83 facilities. Weinstein doesn't know how many are out there but contends that until each and every one is gone, "they're still aiding and abetting the cause of al- Qaeda."

Why? Because it is a national security issue if America is perceived as waging a religious war against the Muslim world. One can't help but get that impression reading the added material in these Holman Bibles, suggesting that that God has blessed the American warrior for his existential struggle of good versus evil.

A crusade — and one playing right into the religious extremism on the other side, putting Americans overseas, and at home, at risk, said Weinstein.

His approach — which is as fiery and combative as the preachers he rebukes (he's taken to calling the Pentagon, "Pentacostal-gon,") — has drawn fire from a number of conservative Christian organizations and websites, which have labeled MRFF a bunch of zealous atheist agitators.

"Why should these Bibles be removed because of the demands of a small activist group?" Ron Crews, head of  The Chaplain Alliance for Religious Liberty, asked last week, adding in an interview with Fox News Radio that the Department of Defense was acting "cowardly" by backing down to MRFF.

"MRFF must cease and desist their reckless assault on religious liberty. The Chaplain Alliance for Religious Liberty calls on Congress to investigate this frivolous threat and apparent discrimination against religious views by the DoD."

But this "reckless assault" has offered the public a window into how much evangelicalism threads through the military ethos today — from the Pentagon buying guns  with sights outfitted with biblical references, to born-again chaplains  directing soldiers to hand out Bibles and proselytize among the Muslim locals in Afghanistan.

MRFF has accused Army chaplains of  using religion in lieu of mental health counseling to aid battlefield stress, and drew attention to  provocative displays of religious murals and crosses sprawled on walls at U.S. bases and on vehicles driven through the urban battlefront. MRFF has protested the taxpayer-funded "Spiritual Fitness Concert Series" performed on bases here in the states, and followed up on complaints by service members at Fort Eustis in Virginia who said they were  punished by a superior officer for not attending. MRFF also helped put the brakes on an Air Force training program in 2011 that used the New Testament and the insights of an ex-Nazi  to teach missile officers about the morals and ethics of launching nuclear weapons.

More recently, MRFF  criticized a fighter squadron's decision to switch back to its old "Crusader" moniker, complete with a Knights Templar red cross emblazoned on its planes. Under pressure, the Marines have since reversed that decision, returning to its old World War II-era "werewolves" nickname,  earlier this month.

 
See more stories tagged with: