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Is the Bible a Threat to National Security?

A military Bible paints war as religious devotion. What could go wrong?

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A largely unfettered one, apparently, as one watches Pentagon officers commenting freely on camera — and in uniform — for this Bush-era  promotional video for Christian Embassy, another federal government-wide "fellowship" with similar missionary goals.

One officer, Air Force Maj. Gen. Jack Catton, who said he worked on the Joint Staff at the Pentagon, described himself as "an old fashioned American and my first priority is my faith in God." Pointing to his meeting with other officers under the auspices of Christian Embassy, he said, "I think it's a huge impact because you have many men and women who are seeking God's counsel and wisdom as we advise the Secretary of Defense."

Then U.S. Brigadier Gen. Bob Caslan (currently promoted to lieutenant general as the commanding general at the U.S. Army's prestigious Combined Arms Center at Ft. Leavenworth, Kan.) went so far as to say he sees the "flag officer fellowship groups ... hold me accountable."

"We are the aroma of Jesus Christ," he added.

Something smells, all right, said Weinstein, who heads the  Military Religious Freedom Foundation (MRFF). The roles of the officers in the video were  later deemed improperafter MRFF demanded an investigation in 2007. As for the Bibles, Weinstein said he received some 2,000 complaints about them from service members over the last year. Weinstein, a former Air Force Judge Advocate (JAG) whose 2005 charges against the Air Force Academy in Colorado led to an investigation that  officially found religious "insensitivity" against non- fundamentalists there, has gone on to expose a much wider climate of  "top-down, invasive evangelicalism" at the institution and throughout the military as a whole.

"We're fighting a Fundamentalist-Christian-Parachurch-Military-Corporate-Proselytizing-Complex," Weinstein said told Antiwar.com last week, "and we have been fighting this for some time." MRFF just posted a video montage, which could easily be called the military evangelicals' greatest hits,  here.

He said aside from "prostituting" the military insignia, the military's endorsement of the Bibles violated federal separation of church and state, and continue to sanction an insidious culture of radical evangelicalism and discrimination throughout the services (as a Jew, Weinstein said he felt the sting of prejudice when he attended the Air Force academy in the late 1970s; his sons had it even worse, he claims, prompting his first formal complaint seven years ago).

Since then, "(MRFF) has had 28,000 clients and a hundred more each month," said Weinstein, rejecting claims by his critics that they are all atheist. He insists that 96 percent of his clients are Christians (Catholic and Mainline Protestant) and that his is not a religious crusade. On the other hand,  some 33 percent of chaplains are now evangelical Christians (Weinstein's MRFF places that number at 84 percent), while only 3 percent of service members describe themselves as such.

"They are spiritually raping the U.S. Constitution, the American people and the men and women who are fighting for us," said Weinstein, who never, ever minces words.

MRFF's lawyers sent  a formal letter to Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta's office in January. In it, MRFF charged that authorizing LifeWay to print its Bibles with the service insignia "is in violation of the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment of the United States Constitution ... and several regulations," and that the authority should be withdrawn immediately or face legal action from MRFF.

Interestingly, according to the  documents now available online, the Army, Navy and Air Force responded to the letter in February, insisting that the summer before Weinstein's lawyers at Jones Day contacted the Pentagon, they had already pulled their trademark authorizations to LifeWay, for "unrelated reasons." So, in effect, according to the military, the Southern Baptist Convention subsidiary no longer had use of the trademarks and the question was moot.

 
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