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10 Amazing Discoveries You Missed This Week

From hidden terrorist messages in porn, to smog-eating buildings, to dolphin coworkers, here are some incredible discoveries.

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Study leader Liming Zhou was quoted in a press release as saying,  "The estimated warming trends only apply to the study region and to the study period, and thus should not be interpolated linearly into other regions (e.g., globally) or over longer periods (e.g., for another 20 years),” so it’s a local and regional effect, which is still being studied.

Eric Niller of Discovery News writes “Zhou cautioned that his study used satellite data, which can have errors from clouds, for example, rather than temperature readings taken at the surface.” Also, making smaller turbines could help though they would produce less power. 

So the story is that Texas surface temperatures have risen with the advent of wind farming; it’s being studied; and there are some potential answers. But the low-hanging fruit of potential irony proved irresistible to some as Quirk points out, like Forbes’ “Wind farms cause global warming!”

We’ve noticed since that the headlines on the subject have been more like " Night Warming Effect Found Over Large Wind Farms in Texas" (from Kansas City InfoZine), but still, Quirk says the exaggerated headlines help justify scientists’ distrust of journalists. 

We get that. Science is about evidence, after all, and if the evidence is that people misconstrue your work it’s fair to be skittish. 

We at Ten Amazing Things want to point out, though, that while we try to put a little panache in our work, we don’t really need verbal photoshop. Why would we? Photos of supernovas from 163,000 light years away? Dolphins that are better coworkers than lots of people we know? To exaggerate these things wouldn’t just be gilding the lily, it would be giving it Botox and implants. When you have the universe, illuminated by scientists, you’ve got plenty. 

 

Liz Langley is a freelance writer in Orlando, FL.

 
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