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The Rise of the Warrior Corporation: Win or Lose on the Battlefield, Big Business Always Comes Out on Top

There are few clear winners in modern American warfare -- except, that is, defense corporations.
 
 
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In the American mind, if Apple made weapons, they would undoubtedly be drones, those remotely piloted planes getting such  great press here.  They have generally been greeted as if they were the sleekest of iPhones armed with missiles.

 

When the first American  drone assassins burst onto the global stage  early in the last decade, they caught most of us by surprise, especially because they seemed to come out of nowhere or from some wild sci-fi novel.  Ever since, they've been touted in the media as the shiniest presents under the American Christmas tree of war, the  perfect weapons to solve our problems when it comes to evildoers lurking in the global badlands.

And can you blame Americans for their  love affair with the drone?  Who wouldn’t be wowed by the most technologically advanced,  futuristic, no-pain-all-gain weapon around?

Here’s the thing, though: put drones in a more familiar context, skip the awestruck commentary, and they should have been eerily familiar.  If, for instance, they were car factories, they would seem so much less exotic to us.

Think about it: What does a drone do?  Like a modern car factory, it replaces a pilot, a skilled job that takes significant training, with robotics and a degraded version of the same job outsourced elsewhere.  In this case, the “offshore” location that job headed for wasn’t China or Mexico, but a military base in the U.S., where a guy with a joystick,  trained in a hurry and sitting at a computer monitor, is “piloting” that plane.  And given our experience with the hemorrhaging of good jobs from the U.S., who will be surprised to discover that, in 2011, the U.S. Air Force was already training  more drone “pilots” than actual fighter and bomber pilots combined?

That’s one way drones are something other than the futuristic sci-fi wonders we imagine them to be.  But there’s another way that drones have been heading for the American “homeland” for four decades, and it has next to nothing to do with technology, advanced or otherwise.

In a sense, drone war might be thought of as the most natural form of war for the All Volunteer Military.  To understand why that’s so, we need to head back to a crucial decision implemented just as the Vietnam war was ending.

Disarming the Amateurs, Demobilizing the Citizenry

It’s true that, in the wake of grinding wars that have also been  debacles -- the Afghan version of which has entered its 11th year -- the U.S. military is in ratty shape.  Its  equipment needsrefurbishing and its troops are worn down. The  stress of endlessly repeated tours of duty in war zones,  brain injuries and other wounds caused by the roadside bombs that have often replaced a visible enemy on the “battlefield,”  suicide rates that can’t be staunched,  rising sexual violencewithin the military, increasing  crime rates around military bases, and all the other strains and pains of unending war have taken their toll.

Still, ours remains an intact, unrebellious, professional military.  If you really want to see a force on its last legs, you need to leave the post-9/11 years behind and go back to the Vietnam era.  In 1971, in  Armed Forces Journal, Colonel Robert D. Heinl, Jr., author of a definitive history of the Marine Corps,  wrote of “widespread conditions among American forces in Vietnam that have only been exceeded in this century by the French Army’s Nivelle mutinies of 1917 and the collapse of the Tsarist armies [of Russia] in 1916 and 1917.”

 
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