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5 Big Lies About the Phony 'War on Religion'

Right-wingers claim Obama and Democrats across the country are waging a war on religion -- and of course, conservatives are the civilian casualties.

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So what is a mandate for birth control becomes, in the words of Congressman Jim Jordan, “free contraceptives, sterilization, and abortion-inducing drugs.”

There'd be nothing wrong with this if it were true—abortion is in fact a legal healthcare procedure in the United States. But the fact is that it's not even close to true – it's just another dangerous elision between contraception—which prevents pregnancy—and abortion, which terminates an existing pregnancy.

While most pro-choicers would like to see abortion covered by health insurance, that's simply not the case and was a big enough point of contention in the fight over healthcare reform that the bill nearly went down. The fact that the right is continuing to lie about it simply shows that they know the American public isn't actually on their side when they tell the truth.

2. Catholic Charities shut down adoption services rather than allow same-gender couples to adopt.

The bishops aren't just mad about contraception, though.

In an NPR story about the “war on religion,” Bishop William Lori of Bridgeport, CT, head of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops' Ad Hoc Committee on Religious Liberty, complained that Illinois-based Catholic Charities was “forced” to shut down its adoption services because it would otherwise have had to start placing orphaned children with same-gender couples.

"...[W]e do have a constitutional right not to be discriminated against because we're following our own convictions," he said.

Other people's convictions—for instance, that no child should go homeless because of antiquated prejudices—don't seem to hold the same weight for the bishops.

A pesky Illinois state law demands that couples joined under the state's civil union law be considered just as valid as male-female couples married by a church—and that includes being able to adopt children. Catholic Charities wanted state money to fund its services, but didn't want to obey the state's non-discrimination law.

Of course, the same right-wingers who call for personal responsibility for struggling Americans don't see anything wrong with government funding for religious organizations.

Just for the record—the Obama administration continues to fund faith-based groups, with $140 million from the stimulus bill alone making its way into the coffers of religious organizations.

3. Tony Perkins whines after Air Force apologizes for promoting an explicitly Christian charity.

Oh, Tony, Tony.

Tony Perkins, president of the Family Research Council, says that Obama has “created an atmosphere that is hostile toward Christianity.”

How's that, exactly? Well, Perkins told James Dobson, founder of Focus on the Family, that the Air Force Academy's apology for promoting Operation Christmas Child, an explicitly Christian ministry, on campus, was creating such an atmosphere.

Operation Christmas Child is not just any Christian ministry, though—it's a subsidiary of Franklin (son of Billy) Graham's Samaritan's Purse. And Graham? His concern for religious liberty is pretty specific, and certainly doesn't apply to Muslims. As Sarah Posner at Religion Dispatches noted, Graham thinks the Muslim Brotherhood has also infiltrated the government. (The complaint that got the Air Force Academy to apologize was filed on behalf of 132 Academy personnel, including two Muslim families.)

Graham is also a notorious birther—and that gets to the heart of these charges that Obama is opposed to religion. As noted above, the claims that Obama doesn't respect religion are deeply connected with the claims that he is a Muslim, or that he is not an American citizen.

So let's get this straight. When the Air Force Academy, a government entity, respects the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment and refuses to endorse an explicitly evangelical Christian charity, that's a war on religion. But if the Air Force Academy supports the charity of a man who calls Islam “a very evil and wicked religion,” it's...protecting religious freedom?

 
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