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3 Strategies for Promoting Women's Right to Safe Abortion Care

Safe and affordable abortion care must become a reality for everyone.

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Judy Norsigian:

I remember an eye-opening conversation many years ago with a priest – a family friend – who had regularly sermonized about the evils of abortion. He described how one year a woman came to him afterwards and described WHY she had had her own abortion and why what he had said in church was so wrong and hurtful to her and many other women. A thoughtful and compassionate person, he decided to cease such sermons, but his comment about this encounter was instructive: "Don't get me wrong, I still think of abortion as killing life in some form…I have not changed my mind about that. But what I realize now is that an abortion can be the RIGHT and moral thing to do."

In the years that followed, I found a number of people who resonated with this kind of thinking and who could find a way to support a woman's right to choose, while, at the same time, holding on to the concept of abortion as an act that destroyed life in some form. They noted that society does, at times, sanction even the killing of human beings (during war, in self defense) and, thus, could envision abortion as a moral choice and one to be preserved for women needing to make that choice.

Ayesha Chatterjee:

Active in the grassroots abortion access movement in the Boston area, I am also expecting my first baby in the spring of 2012. While I see absolutely no dichotomy in my activist and parenting roles, I have been asked a few times whether becoming a mother has softened my position on abortion rights, made me more empathetic to pro-life reasoning. My response: Far from it! My decision to have children is situated within my unique context and personal needs and capacity. If anything, the hands-on experience with the ongoing physical, emotional and financial commitment needed to nurture another human being has only deepened my understanding of an incredibly complex and personal issue, as well as my appreciation of why some decide to terminate their pregnancy and others, despite the many and different challenges, carry theirs to term.

When we are at a loss for words, drawing on other eloquent voices in the reproductive justice movement can help get the discussion started.

For starters, here are a couple such individuals:

Dr. Garson Romalis, a Canadian abortion doctor,  whose speech on January 25, 2008 at the University of Toronto Law School Symposium is well worth reading. Dr. Romalis had been physically attacked -- shot and stabbed, on two different occasions six years apart -- and remained deeply committed to providing abortion services throughout his long career. At the close of his speech, he wanted to describe "one last story that I think epitomizes the satisfaction I get from my privileged work." He continued, "Some years ago I spoke to a class of University of British Columbia medical students. As I left the classroom, a student followed me out. She said: 'Dr. Romalis, you won't remember me, but you did an abortion on me in 1992. I am a second year medical student now, and if it weren't for you I wouldn't be here now.'"

Lynn Paltrow, executive director of National Advocates for Pregnant Women, offers many compelling insights in, for example,  Missed Opportunities in McCorvey v. Hill: The Limits of Pro-Choice Lawyering, in the  New York University Review of Law & Social Change in 2011, or  Long Term Policies, Long Term Gains in Conscience in Winter 2006-2007. In the latter, Paltrow writes:

 
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