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3 Remarkable Occupations You Haven't Heard Enough About

The Occupy protests bear a striking resemblance to one another in spirit, courage and resolve.

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Twenty minutes later he was approached by 10 campus police officers, whose attire he described as "battle ready," and ordered to vacate the bench. Jo stood his ground, exchanging words with the officers for about five minutes about his right, as a student, to sit where he pleased at a school he pays to attend.

The campus police responded that they were required to follow the university president's orders, but Jo remained resolute, even replying, "He [the president] might be your boss, but he's not mine, so I don't have to do what he says." Ultimately, the police became impatient, at which point Jo was lifted from the bench by two officers, thrown to the ground, and cuffed.  As he lay face down with his hands bent behind his back, one arresting officer dug his thumb into Jo’s arm, leading to painful bruising and a possible infection, which he was later denied treatment for at the county jail.

The ACLU filed an injunction and the movement’s permit was reinstated with conditions. According to an ACLU press release :

"The new permit is valid through November 6, and allows for the use of the park as a forum for protest on weekdays from 5:00 PM to 10:00 PM and Saturday and Sunday from 11:00 AM to 5:00 PM. The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) of New Mexico was involved in facilitating the balancing of protesters’ First Amendment rights with the university’s desire to impose reasonable restrictions on the time, place and manner of the protest.”

The various Occupy movements across the country highlight the remarkable level of courage and commitment that protesters have devoted to this cause. Whether it’s New York City, Oakland, Tucson, Richmond, or Albuquerque, the 99 percent have shown that, against all odds, they are here to stay. 

Rania Khalek is an associate writer for AlterNet. Follow her on Twitter  @RaniaKhalek.