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How the FBI's Network of Informants Actually Created Most of the Terrorist Plots "Foiled" in the US Since 9/11

The FBI has built a massive network of spies to prevent another domestic attack. But are they busting terrorist plots—or leading them?

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"Well, I can't say Allah?" Batiste asked.

"Yeah, but this is an English version because Allah, you can say whatever you want, but—"

"Okay. Of course."

"Okay."

"Allah's pledge is upon me. And so is his compact," Batiste said, adding: "That means his angels, right?"

"Uh, huh.  To commit myself," Assaad continued.

"To commit myself."

"Brother."

"Brother," Batiste repeated.

"Uh. That's, uh, what's your, uh, what's your name, brother?"

"Ah, Brother Naz."

"Okay. To commit myself," the informant repeated.

"To commit myself."

"Brother."

"Brother."

"You're not—you have to say your name!" Assaad cried.

"Naz. Naz."

"Uh. To commit myself. I am Brother Naz. You can say, ' To commit myself.'"

"To commit myself, Brother Naz."

Things went smoothly until Assaad got to a reference to being "protective of the secrecy of the oath and to the directive of Al Qaeda."

Here Batiste stopped. " And to...what is the directive of?"

"Directive of Al Qaeda," the informant answered.

"So now let me ask you this part here. That means that Al Qaeda will be over us?"

"No, no, no, no, no," Assaad said. "It's an alliance."

"Oh. Well..." Batiste said, sounding resigned.

"It's an alliance, but it's like a commitment, by, uh, like, we respect your rules. You respect our rules," Assaad explained.

"Uh, huh," Batiste mumbled.

"And to the directive of Al Qaeda," Assaad said, waiting for Batiste to repeat.

"Okay, can I say an alliance?" Batiste asked. " And to the alliance of Al Qaeda?"

"Of the alliance, of the directive—" Assaad said, catching himself. "You know what you can say?  And to the directive and the alliance of Al Qaeda."

 

"Okay, directive and alliance of Al Qaeda," Batiste said.

"Okay," the informant said. "Now officially you have commitment and we have alliance between each other. And welcome, Brother Naz, to Al Qaeda."

Or not. Ultimately, the undercover recordings made by Assaad suggest that Batiste, who had a failing drywall business and had trouble making the rent for the warehouse, was mostly trying to shake down his "terrorist" friend. After first asking the informant for $50,000, Batiste is recorded in conversation after conversation asking how soon he'll have the cash.

"Let me ask you a question," he says in one exchange. "Once I give you an account number, how long do you think it's gonna take to get me something in?"

"So you is scratching my back, [I'm] scratching your back—we're like this," Assaad dodged.

"Right," Batiste said.

The money never materialized. Neither did any specific terrorist plot. Nevertheless, federal prosecutors charged ( PDF [64]) Batiste and his cohorts—whom the media dubbed the Liberty City Seven—with conspiracy to support terrorism, destroy buildings, and levy war against the US government. Perhaps the key piece of evidence was the video of Assaad's Al Qaeda "oath." Assaad was  reportedly paid [65] $85,000 for his work on the case; the other informant got $21,000.

James J. Wedick, a former FBI agent, was hired to review the Liberty City case as a consultant for the defense. In his opinion, the informant simply picked low-hanging fruit. "These guys couldn't find their way down the end of the street," Wedick says. "They were homeless types. And, yes, we did show a picture where somebody was taking the oath to Al Qaeda. So what? They didn't care. They only cared about the money. When we put forth a case like that to suggest to the American public that we're protecting them, we're not protecting them. The agents back in the bullpen, they know it's not true."

 
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