Tea Party and the Right  
comments_image Comments

How I Escaped the "Biblical Family Values" Nightmare That Drives Perry, Bachmann, and Tea Party Politics

How one woman got out of the Quiverfull movement where she homebirthed, homeschooled, home-churched and faithfully submitted to her husband.
 
 
Share
 

Do you remember when it first dawned on you that your relatives are all a bunch of crackpots and weirdos?  Seems like I was around 8 or 9 — my mother worked all night in the casinos and slept most of the day, leaving me alone to protect my naïve older sister from the depraved advances of Mom's alcoholic boyfriends and worry about my big brother's drug addiction. I couldn't count on my grandparents to help — they were too preoccupied with their own divorce, dating, and remarriage dramas.

"Holy sugar," I thought to myself, "these people are seriously messed up!"

That's about the time the fantasies began.  My home, I imagined, was a three-ring circus — and my relatives were the freaks and the clowns.  In my daydreams, I was not really one of them.  No — surely, I was of aristocratic origin.  My REAL family were royalty in a faraway Kingdom and I was born a beloved Princess in a fancy castle with many servants and my own Fairy Godmother.  Somehow, I'd been separated from my blood kin as an infant — I was captured by gypsies and sold in a black market adoption — that's how I ended up being raised by this group of crazies!

ABC's Primetime Nightline recently aired  a segment featuring the Gil & Kelly Bates family — a conservative, Evangelical mega-family of twenty.  The Bates, who are close friends of JimBob & Michelle Duggar of TLC's "19 and Counting" fame, hold to the extreme fundamentalist ideals of the growing " Quiverfull movement."

During the one-hour special, Gil, Kelly, and their children explained the family's lifestyle which, to all modern appearances, represents a throw back to the imaginary 60's-style "Leave It to Beaver" family combined with strict, Victorian Era sexual mores and the atavistic gender roles of ancient goat-herders. The Bates eschew all forms of birth control and adhere to the marriage model of the biblical Patriarchs — with Gil as family leader and Kelly as submissive "help meet."  Kelly and the girls adorn themselves in modest, hand-sewn dresses, while Gil and his clean-cut sons teach bible study and participate in local Tea Party politics.

Aren't they lovely?  Don'tcha wanna be just like them?

I sure did!  I left home at 15 and embarked on a quest to recreate my long-lost perfect, happy family — my REAL courtly family, where I truly belonged.  After a false start involving marriage at 16, a baby at 19, and divorce after seven years of abuse rivaling the most astonishing freak show acts Mom's circus family had ever performed — I remarried, found a "bible-believing" church, and worked hard within the Quiverfull counterculture to implement the best of the best biblical family values into our home life.  I had six more children. I homebirthed, homeschooled, and home-churched. I submitted to my husband and joyfully sacrificed my time, energy and talents to build him up and help him to succeed.  I published a "pro-life, pro-family" Christian family newspaper to inform and encourage other Christians to defend "Traditional Family Values."

In 2003, we were honored as Family of the Year at the Nebraska Family Council's "Salt & Light" awards. I'd finally made it! I had built my own Magic Kingdom where my husband reigned as King and I was his Queen, the children were our loyal subjects and we could all live happily ever after ...

Like the Bates family, we were the perfect picture of the "biblical family values" fantasy — an idealistic vision of big, happy families: devoted husband and wife surrounded by a passel of respectful, obedient children — we were all sweetness and smiles.  It is this mesmerizing dream world which energizes and motivates Tea Party Republicans like Rick Perry and Michele Bachmann to work tirelessly to implement the "pro-family" theocratic agenda into every aspect of American society: not only in politics, but religion, family, media, education, business and entertainment.

 
See more stories tagged with: