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Why the Biggest Energy Suck in Your House May Have to do With Your TV

That little cable box sitting atop your television set is likely the largest single source of electrical waste in your entire household.

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Indeed, it didn't just change Rosenfeld's life, who returned to Berkeley with a bevy of new of ideas and innovations; it changed energy consumption levels for the entire state of California. Rosenfeld developed the basic electronic ballasts that make up compact fluorescent lamps and smart glass that blocks heat in buildings. Rosenfeld didn't stop there. He took his ideas to the policy realm in California's capital of Sacramento. Gov. Jerry Brown at the time was enthralled with Rosenfeld's ideas and prompted him to develop and implement energy conservation structures, such as time-of-day pricing, which shifted energy use to the evenings and smart meters that benefited conservation-oriented consumers.  

"Each such innovation may seem trivial until you consider the size of the markets involved. There are about a hundred million refrigerators in the United States--maybe more. In the early 1970s refrigerators were lightweight and noisy. Rosenfeld and crew upped the efficiency of refrigerator motors from 30 percent to 90 percent and added insulation," writes Ted Nace in Climate Hope. "The result was a machine that used a quarter of the electricity that it previously required and saved its owner $200 or more per year. Due to refrigerator improvements alone, a hundred large coal plants that would have been required were no longer needed."  

If such a revolution in energy use was possible in the 1970s, it is surely possible today, conservationists say. But the companies that manufacture products like set-top boxes are not going to do it on their own.  

"I don't want to use the word 'lazy,'" Alan Meier, a scientist at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, recently told the New York Times, "but [industry has] had different priorities, and saving energy is not one of them."  

NRDC claims that better designed set-top boxes would drastically reduce wasted energy, much like Rosenfeld's smart glass did back in the 1970s. One opportunity, the organization notes, is simply to have these set-up boxes automatically power down to lower levels while not in use.  

Lower energy use for set-top boxes isn't out of reach. In Europe, Sky Broadcasting is already offering customers a simple energy efficient set-top box. The company's HD-DVR uses 23 watts when in use and 13 when it is in the deep sleep mode. In order to continue to receive information, the boxes wake up for a brief moment every 30 minutes to retrieve information on new programs and recording requests by users. If there is no activity to record the box will go back to sleep.  

Sky Broadcasting isn't necessarily being innovative; it is just practicing smart business. Unlike most of its competitors, Sky can boast of energy savings potential to customers and its "best-in-class" power management.  

Will U.S. companies follow Sky's lead? Not until consumers start pressuring their program providers for better, more efficient set-top devices, say experts. Some manufacturers, such as Cisco Systems, Samsung and Motorola have reported they are not feeling the heat, even though their set-top boxes, depending on the number in a given household, can increase from a few dollars to over $10 a month.  

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Energy Star voluntary rating system for set-top boxes is to be made more stringent by 2013. However, some still believe the government must do more than label the devices, it must actually require them to be more efficient, much like California did under Gov. Jerry Brown in the 1970s.   

"Energy activists must work to influence public policy and to educate consumers," says Ned Ford of the Sierra Club. "Consumers can't buy energy-efficient appliances if stores don't stock them, but stores won't stock them if they think people will balk at higher up-front costs for greater efficiency. It's up to the federal government to intervene and require a minimum level of efficiency for all consumer products from appliances to cars."  

 
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