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Billionaire Koch Brothers Next Target of "Anonymous" Hacker Group

The hacker group says they are going after tea party financiers Charles and David Koch for their attempts "to usurp American Democracy."
 
 
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Editor's update: Last night Anonymous knocked out the website of Americans for Prosperity, the right-wing group founded and partly funded by the Kochs.

The decentralized protest group "Anonymous" has a new target: no, it's not a middle eastern dictator, a major bank or even a bit player in the military-industrial complex.

It's none other than tea party financiers Charles and David Koch, who were being targeted, an open letter stated, for their attempts "to usurp American Democracy."

"Koch Industries, and oligarchs like them, have most recently started to manipulate the political agenda in Wisconsin," an announcement posted to anonnews.org declared.

"Governor Walker's union-busting budget plan contains a clause that went nearly un-noticed. This clause would allow the sale of publicly owned utility plants in Wisconsin to private parties (specifically, Koch Industries) at any price, no matter how low, without a public bidding process," they explained. "The Koch's have helped to fuel the unrest in Wisconsin and the drive behind the bill to eliminate the collective bargaining power of unions in a bid to gain a monopoly over the state's power supplies.

The group, which was responsible for taking MasterCard Worldwide offline for an entire day -- along with numerous other organizations that plotted against secrets outlet WikiLeaks -- said it would now be "actively seeking vulnerabilities" in Koch industries.

"In a world where corporate money has become the lifeblood of political influence, the labor unions are one of the few ways citizens have to fight against corporate greed," the release added. "Anonymous cannot ignore the plight of the citizen-workers of Wisconsin, or the opportunity to fight for the people in America's broken political system. For these reasons, we feel that the Koch brothers threaten the United States democratic system and, by extension, all freedom-loving individuals everywhere."

They added that if one would like to withdraw their unknowing support for the brothers Koch, an array of products would need to be boycotted -- and not just by Americans, but people world-wide.

"Anonymous hears the voice of the downtrodden American people, whose rights and liberties are being systematically removed one by one, even when their own government refuses to listen or worse - is complicit in these attacks," they continued. "We are actively seeking vulnerabilities, but in the mean time we are calling for all supporters of true Democracy, and Freedom of The People, to boycott all Koch Industries' paper products. We welcome unions across the globe to join us in this boycott to show that you will not allow big business to dictate your freedom."

In the US, those products were listed as Vanity Fair, Quilted Northern, Angel Soft, Sparkle, Brawney, Mardi Gras and Dixie. For Europe, they were Demak'Up, Kitten Soft, Lotus / Lotus Soft, Tenderly, Nouvelle Soft, Okay Kitchen Towels, Colhogar, Delica, Inversoft and Tutto.

All were produced by the "Georgia-Pacific" company, and all bear the logo seen above.

The Koch's, who've seen their libertarian cause raised to a full-blown rightwing boogyman status, were principle financiers of Wisconsin's Republican Governor, Scott Walker.

Among his first items of business as the state's governor was attempting to crush public worker unions by making it illegal for them to organize into a union. And while he'd been saying throughout the affair that this was not an attempt to bust unions, a front group for the Koch brothers had one of its spokesmen at this year's Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC), who plainly stated that their goal was to take the unions out "at the knees."

Walker was humiliated last week by a gonzo journalist with The Buffalo Beast , who managed to get him on the phone by pretending to be David Koch. During the conversation, the governor admitted to considering sending agent provocateurs into the throngs of protesters to try and stir up trouble. He also appeared to accept an offer for a flight to California, where he was to be shown "a good time" by the tea party financier.

 
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