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Must-Watch TV Makes Bad Journalism: Media Failures in Haiti Coverage

We're seeing it live an upfront with Haiti: TV news routinely falls into the trap of emphasizing visually compelling and dramatic stories at the expense of crucial information.

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How many people watching Cooper's mass-mediated heroism on CNN know that U.S. policy makers have actively undermined Haitian democracy and opposed that country's most successful grassroots political movement? During the first days of coverage of the earthquake, it's understandable that news organizations focused on the immediate crisis. But more than a week later, what excuse do journalists have?

Shouldn't TV pundits demand that the United States accept responsibility for our contribution to this state of affairs? As politicians express concern about Haitian poverty and bemoan the lack of a competent Haitian government to mobilize during the disaster, shouldn't journalists ask why they have not supported the Haitian people in the past? When Bill Clinton and George W. Bush are appointed to head up the humanitarian effort, should not journalists ask the obvious, if impolite, questions about those former presidents' contributions to Haitian suffering?

When mainstream journalists dare to mention this political history, they tend to scrub clean the uglier aspects of U.S. policy, absolving U.S. policymakers of responsibility in "the star-crossed relationship" between the two nations, as a Washington Post reporter put it. When news reporters explain away Haiti's problems as a result of some kind of intrinsic "political dysfunction," as the Post reporter termed it, then readers are more likely to accept the overtly reactionary arguments of op/ed writers who blame Haiti's problems of its "poverty culture" (Jonah Goldberg, Los Angeles Times) or "progress-resistant cultural influences" rooted in voodoo (David Brooks, New York Times).

One can learn more by monitoring the independent media in the United States ("Democracy Now," for example, has done extensive reporting) or reading the foreign press (such as this political analysis by Peter Hallward in the British daily "The Guardian"). When will journalists in the U.S. corporate commercial media provide the same kind of honest accounting?

The news media, of course, have a right to make their own choices about what to cover. But we citizens have a right to expect more.

Robert Jensen is a journalism professor at the University of Texas at Austin and board member of the Third Coast Activist Resource Center . His latest book is Getting Off: Pornography and the End of Masculinity (South End Press, 2007). Jensen is also the author of The Heart of Whiteness: Race, Racism, and White Privilege and Citizens of the Empire: The Struggle to Claim Our Humanity (both from City Lights Books); and Writing Dissent: Taking Radical Ideas from the Margins to the Mainstream (Peter Lang). He can be reached at rjensen@uts.cc.utexas.edu and his articles can be found online at http://uts.cc.utexas.edu/~rjensen/index.html.

 
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