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The Time Is Now for a National Day of Action, March on May 1st

Our May 1st actions will demonstrate support for President Obama's recent assertions that immigration reform is a priority for his administration.
 
 
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WHY WE'RE MARCHING ON MAY 1ST

When Antonio, a high school teacher, was asked why he will march this year, he answered, "I march because my grandfather marched as a Bracero along the railroad tracks of America, and was finally paid this year, four years after his death; because my father, uncles, aunts, cousins and friends have marched, bent over the Michigan crop rows, picking cucumbers and lettuce for the tables of America. I march because thousands of immigrants have sacrificed their lives and homes for a chance at dignified work and a better life."

Like Antonio, hundreds of thousands of people of all races, nationalities, and religions, from all walks of life, dish washers and doctors, seniors toddlers -- will be joining forces to march in cities across the United States on May 1st calling on the Obama Administration to end the cruel enforcement-only immigration policies of the Bush era and calling for passage of humane immigration reform this year.

May 1st is a national Day of Action because it marks the closing of the first 100 days of the new Obama Administration and a day which recognizes workers' rights. For a list of all participating cities (including New York, Miami, Chicago, Los Angeles, Las Vegas, Washington DC) and information on actions, visit www.anewdayforimmigration.org. People can also join a National Mobile Rapid Response Network by texting the word "justice" (or "justicia" for Spanish speakers) and sending it to 69866 to receive important updates.

FIRST 100 DAYS

Our May 1st actions will demonstrate support for President Obama's recent assertions that immigration reform is a priority for his administration. We must ensure that working groups will indeed start crafting legislation as early as this summer and that immigrant and labor advocates are at the table.

Obama's position is in keeping with his pledge to Latino voters. In 2008, at the National Council of La Raza convention, he promised, "I think it's time for a president who won't walk away from something as important as comprehensive reform just because it becomes politically unpopular...I will make it a top priority in my first year as the president of the United States of America....That way, we can reconcile our values as both a nation of immigrants and a nation of laws."