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Will Revelations About Bobby Jindal's Weird Secret Past Destroy His Political Career?

Did you know about the exorcism? The name that came from The Brady Bunch? Those and other surprising facts about a GOP rising politician.
 
 
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Did you know about the exorcism? The name that came from The Brady Bunch? Those and other surprising facts about one of America's fastest rising young politicians.

Last night, on the evening of President Barack Obama's first major speech, the Republicans put forward Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal as the face of the opposition, tapping him to deliver their response. As a 37-year-old Indian-American Rhodes Scholar, the first-term governor presented a deliberate visual counterpoint to Obama. His folksy speech last evening is meeting with mixed reviews. But with GOP politicians already jockeying for the 2012 primary, Jindal is emerging as a top contender.

"From the insiders I'm talking to, Jindal's in the top three, right next to [Sarah] Palin and [Mitt] Romney. He's the rock star of the Republican Party right now," says Jeff Crouere, the former executive director of the Louisiana GOP and host of daily political talk show Ringside Politics.

But as the country gets acquainted with the Bayou's boy wonder, the stranger details of Jindal's religious or personal background remain largely unknown, even among the Republican grassroots. How many Americans know that Jindal boasted of participating in an exorcism that purged the spirit of Satan from a college girlfriend? So far, Jindal's tale of "beating a demon" remains behind the subscription wall of New Oxford Review, an obscure Catholic magazine; only a few major blogs have seized on the story.

Born in Baton Rouge in 1971, Jindal rarely visited his parents' homeland. His birth name was Piyush Jindal. When he was four years old, Piyush changed his name to "Bobby" after becoming mesmerized by an episode of The Brady Bunch. Jindal later wrote that he began considering converting to Catholicism during high school after "being touched by the love and simplicity of a Christian girl who dreamt of becoming a Supreme Court justice so she could stop her country from 'killing unborn babies.'" After watching a short black-and-white film on the crucifixion of Christ, Jindal claimed he "realized that if the Gospel stories were true, if Christ really was the son of God, it was arrogant of me to reject Him and question the gift of salvation."

Jindal's Hindu parents were non-plussed. "My parents have never truly accepted my conversion and still see my faith as a negative that overshadows my accomplishments," he wrote. "They were hurt and felt I was rejecting them by accepting Christianity I long for the day when my parents understand, respect and possibly accept my faith. For now I am satisfied that they accept me." (In a subsequent interview with Little India, Jindal claimed his parents were "very supportive. They felt like it was important that I was embracing God.")

During his years at Brown University, Jindal pursued his Catholic faith with unbridled zeal. Jindal became emotionally involved with a classmate named Susan who had overcome skin cancer and struggled to cope with the suicide of a close friend. Jindal reflected in an article for a Catholic magazine (called "Beating a Demon: Physical Dimensions of Spiritual Warfare") that "sulfuric" scents hovered over Susan everywhere she went. In the middle of a prayer meeting, Jindal claimed that Susan collapsed and began convulsing on the floor. His prayer partners gathered together on the floor, holding hands and shouting, "Satan, I command you to leave this woman!"

While under the supposed control of satanic demons, Susan lashed out at Jindal and his friends. "Whenever I concentrated long enough to begin prayer, I felt some type of physical force distracting me," Jindal reflected. "It was as if something was pushing down on my chest, making it very hard for me to breathe I began to think that the demon would only attack me if I tried to pray or fight back; thus, I resigned myself to leaving it alone in an attempt to find peace for myself."

Toward the conclusion of what Jindal called "the tremendous battle between the Susan we knew and loved and some strange and evil force," Jindal and his friends forced Susan to read passages from the Bible. "She choked on certain passages and could not finish the sentence 'Jesus is Lord.' Over and over, she repeated "Jesus is L..L..LL," often ending in profanities," Jindal wrote. Finally, evil gave way to the light. "Just as suddenly as she went into the trance, Susan suddenly reappeared and claimed 'Jesus is Lord.' With an almost comical smile, Susan then looked up as if awakening from a deep sleep and asked, 'Has something happened?'"

During the 2006 gubernatorial campaign, the campaign of Jindal's Democratic opponent, incumbent Gov. Kathleen Blanco, attempted to inject his religious views into the race by running an ad promoting a website called JindalonReligion.com, which featured his essay about participating in an exorcism. However, Jindal immediately fired back, denouncing the commercial as an assault on his faith and on the deeply religious culture of Louisiana. "Jindal turned that one around and tried to play the victim before [the Democrats] could get any traction," Crouere told me. "Then the Blanco campaign just backed off"

Though Crouere is a Republican, he harbors strong doubts about Jindal. To him, the young governor is still too green for the national stage. "I just find it odd that the GOP seems to have as its savior a guy who has been in Congress for three years and governor for one year," Crouere said. "The same criticism that was leveled against Obama for being untested could easily be leveled against Jindal."

Because Obama entered the presidential campaign without an extensive political track record, the video histrionics of his pastor, Rev. Jeremiah "God Damn America" Wright, remained unexposed until the middle of the Democratic primary. Could similar exposure of Jindal's tales of "spiritual warfare" complicate his ascendancy as well? "The Louisiana Democrats don't really have their act together, and weren't able to get the word out," Crouere remarked. "I still don't think a lot of people are aware of the nature of Jindal's religious background."

Max Blumenthal is a senior writer for The Daily Beast and writing fellow at The Nation Institute, whose book,Republican Gomorrah (Basic/Nation Books), is due this spring. Contact him at maxblumenthal3000@yahoo.com.

Max Blumenthal is a Puffin Foundation writing fellow at the Nation Institute based in Washington, DC. Read his blog at maxblumenthal.blogspot.com.
 
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