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Obama Gathering a Flock of Hawks to Oversee U.S. Foreign Policy

Most of Obama's key foreign policy appointments seem more committed to military dominance than international law.

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Given that the majority of Democrats in Congress, a larger majority of registered Democrats nationally, and an even larger percentage of those who voted for Obama opposed the decision to invade Iraq, it is particularly disappointing that Obama would choose his vice-president, chief of staff, secretary of State, Secretary of Defense, Secretary of Homeland Security and special envoy to Afghanistan and Iraq from the right-wing minority who supported the war.

But the Iraq War isn't the only foreign policy issue where these Obama nominees have demonstrated hawkish proclivities. In previous articles, I have raised concerns regarding the positions of Vice President Joe Biden, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, and White House Chief of Staff Rahm Emanuel . Below is a list of some additional foreign policy appointees who are troubling ...

A Friend of Death Squads Heading Intelligence

One of the most problematic Obama appointees is Admiral Dennis Blair as Director of National Intelligence. Blair served as the head of the U.S. Pacific Command from February 1999 to May 2002 as East Timor was finally freeing itself from a quarter century of brutal Indonesian occupation. As the highest ranking U.S. military official in the region, he worked to undermine the Clinton administration's belated efforts to end the repression, promote human rights and support the territory's right to self-determination. He also fought against Congressional efforts to condition support for the Indonesian military on improving their poor human rights record.

In April 1999, two days after a well-publicized massacre in which dozens of East Timorese civilians seeking refuge in a Catholic church in Liquica were hacked to death by Indonesian-backed death squads, Blair met in Jakarta with General Wiranto, the Indonesian Defense minister and military commander. Instead of pressuring Wiranto to end his support for the death squads, he pledged additional U.S. military assistance, which, according to The Nation magazine, the Indonesian military "took as a green light to proceed with the militia operation." Two weeks later, and one day after another massacre, Blair phoned Wiranto and, rather than condemn the killings he "told the armed forces chief that he looks forward to the time when [the army will] resume its proper role as a leader in the region."

Blair's role in all this is well-known. The Washington Post , for example, reported several months later that "Blair and other U.S. military officials took a forgiving view of the violence surrounding the referendum in East Timor." I was interviewed on NBC Nightly News at the time and spoke directly to Blair's meetings earlier that year.

Combined with Obama's selection of supporters of Morocco's occupation and repression in Western Sahara and Israel's occupation and repression in Palestine to other key foreign policy and national security posts, perhaps it is not surprising that he would pick someone who supported Indonesia's occupation and repression in East Timor. That his pick for DNI would have acquiesced to massacres facilitated by U.S.-backed forces, however, is particularly disturbing.

A Super Hawk at the Pentagon

Obama's decision to Bush appointee Robert Gates as Secretary of Defense was a shock and a betrayal to his supporters who believed that there would be a change in the Pentagon under an Obama administration.

Gates' record of militarism and deceit includes his role in the Iran-Contra scandal, where he apparently took part in the cover-up of the Reagan administration's crimes. Special prosecutor Lawrence Walsh expressed frustration that Gates – well-known for his "eidetic memory" – curiously could not recall information his subordinates, under oath, had sworn they had told him. The special prosecutor's final report noted, "The statements of Gates often seemed scripted and less than candid." Indeed, the best the final report could say was that "a jury could find the evidence left a reasonable doubt that Gates either obstructed official inquiries or that his two demonstrably incorrect statements were deliberate lies."

 
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