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America is Now 'Post Racial?' Don't Be Ridiculous

To all the conservatives saying that racism is now dead: please stop. Please ... stop. Seriously, what you're doing is embarrassing.
 
 
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If you're like me, you justifiably shed tears at the incredible symbolic power unleashed this week when Americans chose Barack Hussein Obama to be our 44th president. Moreover, his victory speech rightfully reminded us after eight years in the Bush wilderness that indeed "our union can be perfected." That there is genuine "hope for what we can and must achieve tomorrow," and the progress we can make for our children in the next 100 years of American history.

I must admit, though, by the next day I felt rather daunted by the enormity of that task. So I was relieved to discover through the searingly insightful analysis provided recently by some conservatives that, as far as continued progress in racial justice is concerned, we are finally off the hook.

Yes indeed, with Obama's election, "America has completed its evolution into a racial meritocracy," wrote Phillip Morris of the Cleveland Plains Dealer. Our country, according to Jonathan Kay of the National Post, "has finally become a fundamentally post-racial society," where in fact, Laura Hollis tells us at townhall.com, "racism is dead."

But if you are still mired in white guilt, or are one of those stubborn "race-obsessed" types who doesn't believe that the remaining racial chasms in education, income and wealth, health care, criminal justice enforcement, yackety schmakety blasé blah can't entirely be explained by, well, minority laziness and lack of initiative, don't fret.

I'm developing a handy guide to help you navigate the new world that awaits you at the stroke of noon on January 20, 2009. I'm calling it, "How You Can Learn to Stop Making Excuses, Throw Away All Your Race Cards and Accept That We Are Living in a Post-Racial Society."

It will be a pocket-sized book full of quotes from those who have evolved to a pure state of total colorblindness. These quotes will remind readers of the inexhaustible cure-all that was the 2008 presidential election.

Dom Apollon is the Research Director at the Facing Race Conference -- the largest national gathering of racial justice advocates -- this week in Oakland, CA.

 
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