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Irish Law, "Conscience Clauses," and Needless Death: Three Questions About Savita Halappanavar's Death

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Written by Editor-in-Chief Jodi Jacobson for RH Reality Check. This diary is cross-posted; commenters wishing to engage directly with the author should do so at the original post.

See all our coverage of the tragic case of Savita Halappanavar here.

Last night, we reported on the unnecessary and tragic death of Savita Halappanavar, who entered an Irish hospital undergoing what turned out to be a miscarriage of a wanted pregnancy at 17 weeks, and was denied a life-saving abortion because, as she and her husband were told, Ireland is "a Catholic country." Translation? Even a non-viable fetus, perhaps already dead but in any case absolutely certain not to survive, is more important than a woman's life.

Numerous questions have arisen in the wake of this case.

One: Why did this happen? Doesn't Ireland, a country with otherwise draconian abortion laws, allow abortion to save the life of the mother?

Two: Was there any doubt an abortion was necessary to save Savita's life?

Three: Can this happen in the United States?

I'll take these in turn.

The reason this happened is at once very simple and highly complex. It starts with Irish abortion law, and ends with the imposition of a misogynistic ideology on a woman literally begging for mercy from pain and for her own life as she pleaded with her doctors numerous times to perform an abortion on a fetus it was clear would not live.

 

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