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Emergency Contraception and Moral Panic: Dissecting the Newest Misinformation Campaign

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Written by Sidra Zaidi for RH Reality Check. This diary is cross-posted; commenters wishing to engage directly with the author should do so at the original post.

Reproductive rights advocates have something to cheer about: A federal judge ruled last week that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) must allow universal access to Plan B over-the-counter for all ages. But anti-choice proponents want to have the last word on emergency contraception (EC), also known as the morning-after pill. Their strategy to limit access includes claiming that EC is unsafe for adolescents.

After Judge Edward Korman's ruling, Charmaine Yoest of Americans United for Life said: "This decision allows the abortion industry to gamble with young girls' health in distributing a life-ending drug, with no real understanding of the long-term implications on their bodies."

A spokeswoman for the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops stated that the court's action "undermines parents' ability to protect their daughters ... from the adverse effects of the drug itself."

Once again, the anti-choice community is using inaccurate information to limit women's and girl's reproductive rights. There is no evidence that Plan B is a "life-ending drug:" EC is not the abortion pill. It works by preventing or delaying ovulation and does not interfere with implantation of a fertilized egg or with an existing pregnancy.

Nor do any studies demonstrate that EC has "adverse effects" let alone "long-term implications" for girls' bodies. Plan B is safer than aspirin: It has few or no immediate side effects and no long-term side effects. In fact, the drug meets all of the FDA's objective criteria for switching a drug from prescription to non-prescription status: It is non-toxic, it is impossible to overdose on it, it has no harmful effects on a woman or teen or a possible pregnancy, and it is not addictive. Girls and women are able to self-diagnose their risk and understand how to use EC from simply reading the label. Finally, Plan B does not require any medical screening or intervention from a health care worker to use it safely.

 

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