Sex & Relationships

There's a New Way to Play Music to Your Unborn Baby — but It's Invasive to Say the Least

A new device claims it can deliver music to fetuses in the womb.

Photo Credit: Shutterstock

Everybody likes music, even fetuses.

A new device called Babypod has hit the market and it promises to grant pregnant mothers the opportunity to play music (or podcasts) for their unborn children. All they have to do is insert the device into their vaginas and connect to their iPhones.

Pregnant mothers playing music for their unborn babies has become pretty trendy. And while research has yet to prove it can make the babies "smarter," there is evidence to suggest that they can respond to some sound stimuli. “Their brains do not wait for birth to start absorbing information,” Dr. Patricia K. Kuhl explained to WebMD

Marisa Lopez-Teijon of the Institut Marquès, which sells the Babypod, says, “Babies start to communicate before birth. From sixteen weeks, [they] are already able to respond to musical stimuli.”

The company claims that there’s a difference between playing music via the vagina and via the abdomen. According to them, the only way music can reach the baby is vaginally. This is because the vagina is a “closed space,” so sound is not dispersed in the environment. There is also less soft tissue separating the baby from the sound, with only the vaginal and uterine walls.

When researchers from the Institut Marquès began researching fetal hearing, they delivered sound to the uterus through a small vaginal device. They discovered that the babies responded by moving their mouths and tongues.

At 16 weeks, the hearing system of an unborn baby is already fully developed. It's the first sense developed in the embryo. Many pediatricians believe music helps improve neurological development.

Check out the company's promotional video below.

Carrie Weisman is a writer focusing on sex, relationships and culture. 

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