Sex & Relationships

Prostitute Helps Debunk 3 Scary Myths About Penis Size

Does size matter? Do women gossip about it? A Las Vegas prostitute addresses some common male worries.

Photo Credit: Shutterstock.com

If you don’t think penis size is a real concern among males, I suggest you visit the Penis Enlargement Gym, an online community of about 70,000 devoted to helping men enlarge their members through a series of stretches and exercises. If stretching this sensitive part of the body doesn’t sound appealing, there’s the list of pills, products and procedures to choose from (see your local snake oil salesman). If there’s one thing to take away from the industry’s ever expanding market, it’s that the panic over penis size is real. Fortunately, one woman is out to extinguish those fears. Her name is Blithe, and she is a licensed prostitute.

Blithe works at Sheri’s Ranch, a legal brothel located in Pahrump, Nevada. In a blog post featured on the official site, Blithe writes, “Prostitutes are penis experts. There is no other group of professionals—not scientists, not academic researchers, not journalists—that have more experience viewing and handling a large number and wide variety of penises.” (Notably, she does not mention urologists, arguably the main penis experts, but you get her meaning, which she proceeds to spell out.)

She adds, “Prostitutes are probably the only professional group qualified to comment on how penises of differing sizes and shapes feel when they are inside a woman.”

Summarized below is Blithe’s account of the three most pervasive myths surrounding penis size.

Myth # 1: There is no such thing as an “ideal” penis size.

“I’m here to tell you that as long as your penis is healthy, it’s ideal for sex and is capable of pleasing a woman.”

We all know that the “different strokes for different folks” idiom can be aptly applied to sex. Unfortunately, the phrase, “different masses for different lasses” has yet to catch on. Women differ in what gets them off. So it should seem pretty obvious that there will never be one perfectly designed penis equipped to fulfill each and every woman’s unique needs.

“Size is not everything,” Carol Queen notes in The Sex and Pleasure Book. “Don’t assume that a larger penis… is the key to a female partner’s ability to orgasm.” She explains that female pleasure has much more to do with arousal than it does size. 

“Comparing yourself to a statistical average or striving for an ideal will not only give you a false perception of the wonderful diversity of healthy penises, but also impair your ability to see yourself as a valuable individual who uses your unique body to be the best lover your partner ever had,” Blithe writes.

Myth #2: The size of your penis determines how much you can please a woman.

“You can and should use more than just your penis to please a woman.”

Seventy percent of women need clitoral stimulation to achieve orgasm. That means a lot of ladies are experiencing their Os outside of penetration. And that means the penis probably isn’t the only piece of equipment involved.

When the penis is used as the primary tool to deliver orgasm, the focus usually jumps to one of the most elusive areas in sex: the G-spot. The G-spot is an area generally located two or three inches inside the vagina. Now even the most strident size-queens will admit it doesn’t take much in the way of size to reach that. “No matter what the size, if you apply pressure in the right areas or use the right rhythm it’s going to make her feel good,” says Blithe.

Myth #3: Women gossip about size.

“When women do kiss and tell, I’ve found that the focus is almost always on a man’s performance, and not on his penis size at all.”

Now, I’m not going to say women don’t discuss their sexual encounters—some do. If you throw some wine into the mix they might even demonstrate some of your more impressive stunts. But as Blithe points out, the conversation rarely centers on size. Technique is important. You can have the most beautiful model in the world, but unless you teach him how to work the runway, the performance is going to fall flat. “Not all women orgasm via vaginal intercourse even when with a well-endowed partner,” says Queen.

Among friends, it’s much more interesting to discuss sex as an experience than as a massive and messy genital collison. And not too much attention is going to be placed on the few inches difference from your last encounter. Blithe writes, “What I’ve discovered during my time as a sex worker is that what matters most is the person attached to the penis, not the penis itself.”

Carrie Weisman is a writer focusing on sex, relationships and culture. 

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