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Terror Advisor: Obama Replacing 'Global War on Terror' With New Strategy

President Barack Obama is replacing the "global war on terror" with a new strategy more narrowly focused on Al-Qaeda and relying more on a broader effort to engage the Muslim world, a top aide said Thursday.

"U.S. President Barack Obama signs an executive order to close the "War on Terror" prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, during a ceremony in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, DC, in January 2009. Obama is replacing the "global war on terror" with a new strategy more narrowly focused on Al-Qaeda and relying more on a broader effort to engage the Muslim world, a top aide said Thursday."

John Brennan, Obama's chief counter-terrorism advisor, said Al-Qaeda remains a "persistent and evolving threat" to the United States and is being aggressively targeted by the new administration.

"But describing our efforts as a 'global war' only plays into the warped narrative that Al-Qaeda propagates," Brennan said in comments prepared for delivery to a think tank here.

"It plays into the misleading and dangerous notion that the U.S. is somehow in conflict with the rest of the world," he said.

He said Obama was bringing to the issue "a fundamentally new and more effective approach" by attacking the longer-term problem of Muslim extremism through diplomacy and political and economic strategies.

"Indeed, the counterinsurgency lessons learned in Iraq and Afghanistan apply equally to the broader fight against extremism: we cannot shoot ourselves out of this challenge," he said.

"We can take out all the terrorists we want -- their leadership and their foot soldiers. But if we fail to confront the broader political, economic, and social conditions in which extremists thrive, then there will always be another recruit in the pipeline, another attack coming downstream," he said.

Brennan outlined ambitious goals for promoting economic and political development in poor, conflict-ridden regions of the world as well diplomatic efforts to restore U.S. standing among Muslims.

His speech came on the anniversary of a 2001 U.S. intelligence warning famously ignored by then president George W. Bush which said Al-Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden was plotting attacks on the United States.

"John Brennan, Assistant to the President for Homeland Security, seen here in April 2009, at the White House in Washington, DC. Brennan, Obama's chief counter-terrorism advisor, said Al-Qaeda remains a "persistent and evolving threat" to the United States and is being aggressively targeted by the new administration."

"President Obama is under no illusions about the imminence and severity of this threat," Brennan said. "Indeed, he has repeatedly and forcefully challenged those who suggest that this threat has passed."

Brennan invoked his own credentials as a longtime CIA officer who served as the agency's station chief in Saudi Arabia to defend Obama against critics who have questioned his commitment to the fight against terrorism.

"Over the past six months we have presented President Obama with a number of actions and initiatives against Al-Qaeda and other terrorist groups.

"Not only has he approved these operations, he has encouraged us to be even more aggressive, even more proactive, and even more innovative, to seek out new ways and new opportunities for taking down these terrorists before they can kill more innocent men, women, and children," he said.

Brennan said Al-Qaeda and its affiliates were "under tremendous pressure."

"After years of U.S. counterterrorism operations, and in partnership with other nations, Al-Qaeda has been seriously damaged and forced to replace many of its top-tier leadership with less experienced and less capable individuals," he said.

"Nevertheless, Al-Qaeda has proven to be adaptive and highly resilient and remains the most serious terrorist threat we face as a nation," he added.

"The group's intent to carry out attacks against the United States and U.S. interests around the world -- with weapons of mass destruction if possible -- remains undiminished, and another attack on the U.S. homeland remains the top priority for the Al-Qaeda senior leadership," he said.

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