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US looks for motive after bomb suspect caught

People visit a make-shift memorial in Boston on April 20, 2013 the morning after the remaining bombing suspect is caught
People visit a make-shift memorial on Boylston Street on April 20, 2013, near the scene of the Boston Marathon explosions, as people get back to normal life the morning after the capture of the remaining suspect wanted in the bombings. Armed police guarde

Armed police guarded Boston bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev in hospital Saturday as the United States sought clues as to why the teenager and his older brother turned to terrorism.

Tsarnaev was in serious condition in a hospital where some victims of Monday's marathon bombing are being treated, as Boston sought to recover from its ordeal with the famed Red Sox baseball team paying a special tribute to its home city.

The 19-year-old, whose family members are ethnic Chechens, was wounded in a shootout with police early Friday in which his 26-year-old brother Tamerlan was killed. The teenager was caught later in the day hiding in a boat in the Boston suburb of Watertown.

Prosecutors were at the Beth Israel Deaconess Hospital in Cambridge, just outside Boston, working out possible charges.

US authorities now face tough decisions over how to handle the investigation and any trial of Tsarnaev for the marathon bombs that left three dead and about 180 injured.

A policeman was killed and another critically wounded during the hunt for the brothers blamed for the worst attack on the United States since the September 11, 2001 atrocities.

This undated image released by the FBI shows Boston bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, April 19, 2013
This undated image released by the FBI shows Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, who police have taken into custody on April 19, 2013, according to the Boston Police Department.

Republican Senators John McCain and Lindsey Graham have called for the teenager to be declared an "enemy combatant," which would give him the same status as Guantanamo "war on terror" detainees.

According to some media reports, authorities did not read Tsarnaev his normal rights to see a lawyer when he was captured, invoking a special exception for security reasons. Neither prosecutors nor the Federal Bureau of Investigation have commented yet on the procedure to be used.

Tsarnaev was caught after a Watertown resident saw blood on a boat he kept in his backyard, lifted the cover and saw the teenager curled up inside, police said.

Police surrounded the University of Massachusetts student for a showdown that included a final gunbattle before Tsarnaev gave up to FBI agents.

Thermal images taken by a police helicopter overhead showed the suspect lying down as he hid in the tarp-covered boat, and a robotic arm later reaching into the boat to lift the tarp with cameras attached to look inside.

"The terror is over. And justice has won," the Boston police department said on Twitter announcing the end of the hunt. People across the city descended into the streets to celebrate, chanting: "USA! USA!" Some climbed onto car roofs to applaud police.

In a final rampage, a police officer was killed. The suspects then carjacked a Mercedes and hurled explosives at police chasing them.

A few of the estimated 200 people who celebrated in Boston the capture of the Boston bombing suspect, April 19, 2013
A few of the estimated 200 people who poured onto Hemingway Street in the Fenway neighborhood to celebrate after the announcement earlier of the capture of the second Boston Martathon bombing suspect on April 19, 2013 in Boston, Massachusetts.

Tamerlan Tsarnaev died after a gunbattle in which he was wounded by police shots and explosives he was carrying. His brother was also hit but escaped.

Watertown police chief Edward Deveau said the pair had at least six bombs with them when being chased and that Dzhokhar had driven over his brother as he escaped.

There is now intense scrutiny into how the brothers, who moved to the United States around 2002, apparently turned to radical Islam.

The FBI acknowledged on Friday that an unnamed foreign government had asked for information about Tamerlan Tsarnaev's possible terror ties in 2011. The FBI interviewed the man but said it had found no terror activity.

President Barack Obama acknowledged that "many unanswered questions" remain about the case.

US President Barack Obama makes a statement on the bombing suspect at the White House on April 19, 2013, Washington, DC
US President Barack Obama makes a statement in the briefing room of the White House on April 19, 2013 in Washington, DC, after law enforcement officials captured the second suspect believed to be responsible for the Boston Marathon bombings.

"Among them, why did young men who grew up and studied here as part of our communities and our country resort to such violence? How did they plan and carry out these attacks? And did they receive help?" he asked after the arrest.

Obama vowed that authorities would "investigate any associations that these terrorists may have had."

Some reports say Tamerlan Tsarnaev, who spent six months in Russia last year, had become a fervent Muslim with an overbearing influence on his brother.

While Tamerlan had dropped out of school before going to university, the younger man was a talented student who attended University of Massachusetts at Dartmouth.

Dzhokhar became a US citizen last year. Many of his teachers and friends have expressed shock at his involvement in the bombing.

A boy visits a make-shift memorial in Boston on April 20, 2013 the morning after the remaining bombing suspect is caught
A boy visits a make-shift memorial on Boylston Street on April 20, 2013, near the scene of Boston Marathon explosions, as people get back to normal life the morning after the capture of the remaining suspect wanted in the Boston Marathon bombings.

The men's social media pages appeared to express sympathy with the struggle of Chechnya, which has been ravaged by two wars since 1994 between Russia and Islamist-leaning separatist rebels.

Obama and Russian President Vladimir Putin agreed during telephone talks to step up cooperation against terror, particularly after the Boston case, the Kremlin and White House said.

"Both sides underscored their interest in bolstering the close cooperation of Russian and US special services in the fight against international terrorism," the Kremlin said in a statement.

Fifty-eight of the victims from the bomb attack are still in Boston hospitals with three in critical condition.

The Boston Red Sox paid an emotion tribute to the city in its first home game since the bombing. Victims and rescuers were present for a moment of silence for the dead and injured.

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