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Long-term study debunks myth of the “crack baby”

After nearly 25 years of research, one of the nation's largest long-term studies on the so-called "crack baby" epidemic of the 1980s has concluded that there are no statistically significant differences in the long-term health and life outcomes between full-term babies exposed to cocaine in-utero and those who were not.

Instead, researchers found poverty to be a key determining factor in how well children performed later in life. As Hallam Hurt, the former chair of neonatology at Albert Einstein Medical Center and the study's lead researcher, told the Philadelphia Inquirer: "Poverty is a more powerful influence on the outcome of inner-city children than gestational exposure to cocaine."

More on the study from the Inquirer:

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