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What If You Couldn't Understand Your Doctor? A New "Interpreter Bill" Would Save Lives Lost In Translation

One patient mistakenly aborted her baby due to language barriers—and her story is far from unique.
 
 
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Photo Credit: Illustration: Lalo Alcaraz.

 
 
 
 

Maria Guevara had been trying to get pregnant for three years when she saw a doctor at Los Angeles County General hospital in 2008. She was understandably thrilled, then, to learn she was indeed three months pregnant at the time of her visit. As Guevara later recalled, when the doctor asked her in English if she wanted to keep the baby, “without hesitation I replied ‘yes’ to his question. Before leaving the hospital, the doctor prescribed me medication that I thought was prenatal care. That lack of communication between the doctor and me has changed my life forever.”

Guevara took the prescribed medication, and experienced violent pain and bleeding. She returned to the hospital, where another doctor told her the bleeding was the result of a miscarriage.

“My baby was dead. The medication the initial doctor prescribed to me was not prenatal care but medication to induce an abortion,” she told a press conference in April at the University of California Davis Medical Center in Sacramento. “Not speaking any English, I was unable to understand his question to me. He did not speak Spanish and no interpreter was provided.”

This occurred at the largest single health care provider for a county where 37 percent of the population is comprised of Spanish-speakers.

“Losing my baby forced me into a deep depression,” Guevara said. “I could not bear looking at or holding babies because the thought brought back painful emotions.”

Although California has some of the strongest laws in the nation spelling out a patient’s right to an interpreter, stories like Guevara’s are far from unique. Day after day, non-English speaking patients are seeing doctors and nurses throughout California without the aid of medical interpreters, sometimes with tragic results, a Frying Pan News investigation has found.

Hardly a day goes by when Julio Perez doesn’t think about his joyful little brother Aldo, an energetic five-year-old who loved watching cartoons – and how Aldo might be alive today if his parents had been able to communicate with doctors.

Both brothers got sick one day in March 2008, and their mother first took them to a clinic with a Spanish-speaking doctor in South Gate, about seven miles southeast of downtown Los Angeles. Each of the boys was given a shot. Julio got better; Aldo did not. Their mother took Aldo back to the clinic, then to two hospitals. At the second hospital, Long Beach Memorial Medical Center, which had more sophisticated medical care available, an interpreter was summoned to explain the liability forms. Once the forms were signed, Julio recalls, the interpreter left and never returned.

None of the doctors or nurses the family dealt with at LBMMC spoke fluent Spanish.

“I had to be the interpreter,” Julio says. As he remembers, doctors said that his brother had a serious bacterial infection. Numerous medical procedures followed, as doctors tried to save Aldo’s life. He died on April 14, 2008.

“I feel that my baby brother’s death was an injustice,” says Julio Perez, now 24. He believes the hospital kept his family in the dark about Aldo’s condition. “If we had proper interpreting services . . . my parents could have asked questions.”

California Assemblyman Dr. Richard Pan (D-Sacramento), a pediatrician and chairman of the Assembly’s Health Committee, says that Maria Guevara’s story, which he heard firsthand in April, epitomizes the need for an effective statewide system of medical interpreters. “That story tells you the horrendous consequences of not being able to communicate between a patient and a health care provider,” he says in an interview.