Personal Health

A Renowned Neurologist and Gut Doctor Debunks 5 Major Health Myths

Fats and cholesterol are far more essential than we've been led to believe.

Photo Credit: YouTube

Natasha Campbell-McBride is a neurologist and the author of the new book, "Gut And Psychology Syndrome: Natural Treatment for Autism, ADHD, Dyslexia, Dyspraxia, Depression and Schizophrenia." In her book and in her lectures, she debunks some of our most pervasive myths about how to maintain a healthy diet.

Here are five of her most important findings.

1. On high blood cholesterol.

Fats and cholesterol are "healing agents in the body," Campbell-McBride notes. "Essential for repair."

"Remember, your immune system is largely made out of cholesterol and saturated fat, and it requires a lot of these substances to fight, to work. And repair needs them to build new tissues, to give birth to new cells," she says. "So both of them need these substances."

According to Campbell-McBride, high blood cholesterol is necessary to handle immediate stress. 

"Every time you have stress, severe stress, you will have high blood cholesterol. Because stress hormones need to be manufactured, and because a lot of damage was caused by stress in the body," the doctor explains.

2. On low blood cholesterol.

"Because the brain has self-regeneration processes going on all the time, cells in the brain do die, and they get replaced by newly born cells," she says. "And these new baby cells need building materials." 

The building materials are made "from cholesterol, saturated fats, proteins, glyconutrients, and some other things. But the largest percentage is fat and cholesterol."

"If the blood cholesterol is low, the brain is not getting enough to maintain its structure, and to function properly," Campbell-McBride points out. "People with low blood cholesterol have aggressive personalities, and poor self-control. Because—in order to form memories in the brain—synapses have to be formed."

3. On good and bad sugar products.

"When you analyze a sugar beet, a piece of sugar beet in laboratory, for every molecule of sugar, there are 56 molecules of magnesium, and there are the right number of molecules of chromium, and there are those amino acids and enzymes and vitamins, and all the other nutrients," she explains. "It is a whole food that Mother Nature packed together in order for that molecule of sugar to be processed properly by the body and to be metabolized properly in order to do only good for us."

Factory manufacturing, she argues, has stripped bread of its natural powers.

"Nobody goes around munching sugar beet," she quipped. "Same as sugar cane... No, what we do in our factories is we take the sugar out of the beet, out of the sugar cane, and we throw all the other nutrients away."

4. On activity in the bloodstream.

With regards to heart disease, "many people heard the same story: that it's just fat and cholesterol being stuck inside your artery, blocking it up and not allowing the blood flow." 

"Now we know through all our recent research that atherosclerosis is an inflammatory condition. It's inflammation — rampant inflammation — which is out of control, running wild inside the artery." 

Why is this happening? 

"Anything damaging that gets into your body sooner or later finishes up in your bloodstream," she explains. "[That's] because your bloodstream is your motorway system... so any virus, any bacterium, any fungus, any parasite, any toxin, any chemical or anything else damaging that gets into the bloodstream when it's floating in your blood, what is it going to do? It's going to attack." 

5. On vegetarianism and veganism.

"The bulk of nutrition humans thrive on comes from [an] animal—meat, fish, eggs, dairy," she explains."These are the building, feeding foods for the human body. All traditional cultures around the world knew this through experience."

Alexandra Rosenmann is an AlterNet associate editor. Follow her @alexpreditor.

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