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Ohio Public Poised to Overturn Anti-Collective Bargaining Bill: Backlash Against Union-Busting in Full Swing

 
 
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 In a welcome signal of momentum, it looks like Ohio voters are getting ready to reject the noxious anti collective-bargaining bill forced through by their governor John Kasich--and if they had their druthers they'd reject Kasich as well.

Kasich was one of the many governors who eagerly took a page out of Scott Walker's authoritarian anti-union book and tried to ape his move to shut down bargaining rights, right over the outcry of thousands upon thousands of protesters who objected.

Now it seems that the tide has turned.

From Public Policy Polling:

 

Labor is poised for a big victory in Ohio next month- PPP's newest poll of the state finds that voters intend to reject Senate Bill 5 by a 56-36 margin. Although that margin is consistent with what we found in the state earlier this year, when we polled Ohio in August the support for repealing SB 5 had tightened to 50-39.  These numbers suggest that momentum is back on the side of the groups trying to kill the bill.

 

The pollsters at PPP make no qualms about what this vote would signify, either:

...The rejection of Senate Bill 5 would be a huge defeat for John Kasich, and Kasich continues to be the most unpopular Governor PPP has polled on anywhere in the country in 2011. Just 37% of voters approve of the job he's doing to 54% who disapprove. He has an unusually high number of Republicans disenchanted with him- 23%- and he attracts little crossover support from Democrats to make up for that, with only 10% of them approving of him. Independents split against him by a 49/43 margin as well.

Given Kasich's unpopularity it's no surprise that Ohio voters continue to feel significant buyer's remorse about their choice for Governor last year. If they could do it over again 54% of voters say they would pick Ted Strickland to only 40% who would stick with Kasich.

Between this news and the upcoming recall drive to oust Walker, the promised backlash against these anti-union seems to be arriving. Hopefully the fact that the "Occupy" movement has also been able to steer  the national conversation back to economic inequality has been a boon to workers in these midwestern states.

 

AlterNet / By Sarah Seltzer

Posted at October 19, 2011, 6:34am