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Obama Historically Nominates Abundance of Women and Minorities to the Judiciary: Will the GOP Block Such Incredible Strides?

 
 
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Obama made history when he was elected to be the first black president, and now he is taking historic measures to further diversify the judiciary, creating a ruling body that responds better to all its constituents and signifying a push towards racial equality.  Whie he already - and quite famously - nominated Sonia Sotomayor, the first Latina Supreme Court Justice, and Elana Kagan, the fourth woman to the bench, Obama is not losing pace.  In fact, it seems his appointments - if passed by the filibuster-happy  Senate - may create some historic diversity.  In light of the right-wing, Koch-brother-fraternizing, corrupt Roberts court, the nominations (if confirmed) may be especially important. 

From TheGrio:

President Barack Obama is moving at a historic pace to try to diversify the nation's federal judiciary: Nearly three of every four people he's gotten confirmed to the federal bench are women or minorities, the first president who hasn't selected a majority of white males for lifetime judgeships.
More than 70 percent of Obama's confirmed judicial nominees during his first two years were "non-traditional," or nominees who were not white males. That far exceeds the percentages in the two-term administrations of Bill Clinton -- 48.1 percent -- and George W. Bush -- 32.9 percent, according to Sheldon Goldman, author of the authoritative book "Picking Federal Judges."


More than 70 percent of Obama's confirmed judicial nominees during his first two years were "non-traditional," or nominees who were not white males. That far exceeds the percentages in the two-term administrations of Bill Clinton -- 48.1 percent -- and George W. Bush -- 32.9 percent, according to Sheldon Goldman, author of the authoritative book "Picking Federal Judges."

And:

Of the 98 Obama nominees confirmed through his nearly three years in office to date, the administration counts 21 percent as African-American, 11 percent as Hispanic, 7 percent Asian-American and almost half -- 47 percent -- as women. By comparison, of the 322 judges confirmed during George W. Bush's presidency, 18 percent were minorities, and 22 percent were female. Of the 372 judges confirmed during Clinton's terms, 25 percent were minorities, and 29 percent were women. In these figures, some judges fit into more than one category.

The numbers are a wonderful statement to the Progressive values of Obama, who was recently criticized for maintaining a sexist book list.  But the question that remains is whether the Senate and its right-wing officials will let such a historic measure slide, or play off Americans' illogical fear of a minority overhaul in the U.S. With the race-wealth gap the largest in 25 years - when the Census started recording the data --  now is the time to be proactive about creating equality in America. 

AlterNet / By Kristen Gwynne

Posted at September 13, 2011, 8:48am