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Atheists, Muslims More Popular Than Tea Party (Also, Tea Party's Just a New Name for Racist Christian Right)

Is the media's romance with the Tea Party finally going to be ended by cold, hard facts?
 
 
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Is the media's romance with the Tea Party finally going to be ended by cold, hard facts?

The results of a comprehensive New York Times polling project (document link here) offer some good news to that end. The results show that public opinion is trending away from Tea. They also dispel some big myths about the Tea Party being economic in nature rather than what it actually is: a re-branded, repurposed version of the same old Christian Right. This may seem familiar to AlterNet readers--but still, it's good to have the numbers and the mainstream attention to highlight such a crucial truth.

Here's the juiciest nugget from professors David E. Campbell and Robert D. Putnam in the Times, one which encapsulates the Tea Party's growing unpopularity with a vivid comparison or two (emphases mine):

Of course, politicians of all stripes are not faring well among the public these days. But in data we have recently collected, the Tea Party ranks lower than any of the 23 other groups we asked about — lower than both Republicans and Democrats.It is even less popular than much maligned groups like “atheists” and “Muslims.” Interestingly, one group that approaches it in unpopularity is the Christian Right.

Alex Seitz-Wald at Think Progress, highlighting the above results, also notes that these unpopularity numbers for the Tea Party have skyrocketed over the past year or so.

The professors, who have conducted a wide-ranging survey of interviews over time, go on to shatter the big canard of the Tea Party's "creation myth" and image in the mainstream media, pointing to data collected before and after the birth of the "Tea Party" to back up their claims. The results, below:

So what do Tea Partiers have in common? They are overwhelmingly white, but even compared to other white Republicans, they had a low regard for immigrants and blacks long before Barack Obama was president, and they still do.

More important, they were disproportionately social conservatives in 2006 — opposing abortion, for example — and still are today. Next to being a Republican, the strongest predictor of being a Tea Party supporter today was a desire, back in 2006, to see religion play a prominent role in politics.

Andrew Sullivan writes about how pivotal this numerical information is: "Now we have some large data sets to review the reality. And the reality is that the Tea Party is the Christianist right-wing of the GOP." First-person evidence leads to the same place.  Abe Sauer at The Awl draws the exact the same conclusion as Sullivan and the Times data after two years hanging out in a more social sense with the Tea Party, to which he initially felt sympathetic:  "Two years of Tea Party functions later, and I finally know what the Tea Party wants: A Christian nation."

Again,  "The Tea Party is about small government" is a myth that progressives have emphatically been pointing to as untrue, and the long line of conservative social legislation that's been passed by states controlled by Tea Party blocs suggests the same.

Adele Stan here at AlterNetand our colleagues like Sarah Posner and others have been hammering home this fact for a long time, but really it's good to see that the MSM is catching up, and that apparently, so is the majority of the country. This is a message that needs to be repeated until it sinks in. The Tea Party is nothing new. Same problem, new name.

Now, if only this information meant that politicians could ignore this bloc, that the Tea Party didn't retain its ability to hold our government hostage. Still, it's a step in the right direction.

AlterNet / By Sarah Seltzer

Posted at August 17, 2011, 7:38am