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WATCH: Stephen Colbert Declares Victory Over #CancelColbert Forces

Colbert returned to his desk for the first time since the Twitter outrage began. Hilarity ensued.
 
 
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A triumphant Stephen Colbert got the last laugh on the #CancelColbert movement on Twitter in his first segment since the controversy morphed into a hashtag. 

Colbert has been criticized for a racially insensitive tweet that was sent from the Comedy Central show's Twitter account on March 27. The tweet read: “I am willing to show #Asian community I care by introducing the Ching-Chong Ding-Dong Foundation for Sensitivity to Orientals or Whatever.”

The joke, tweeted without proper context, was referring to a bit from the previous day's episode, in which Colbert mocked Washington Redskins owner Dan Snyder's attempt to appease Native Americans by establishing the "Washington Redskins Original Americans Foundation." The Redskins organization is criticized over the team name, which many consider to be racist. 

Yet, the tweet outraged some Twitter users, who quickly put into motion a #CancelColbert campaign.

Yesterday's episode began with a dream-sequence segment.  Law & Order Special Victims Unit actor B.D. Wong, who is Asian, appeared as Colbert's therapist while he was on the couch wearing Washington Redskins' gear. 

The segment was followed by Colbert at his desk, where he declared: "Folks, I'm still here...the dark forces trying to silence my message of core conservative principles mixed with youth-friendly product placement have been thwarted."

Colbert then defended himself, saying that Ching-Chong Ding-Dong was a long-running character on the show.

"Who would think that a means of communication limited to 140 characters could ever create a misunderstanding," said Colbert.

Colbert also asked his viewers not to attack the Twitter activist that started the #CancelColbert hashtag, saying that she was just speaking her mind.

 

Cliff Weathers is a senior editor at AlterNet, covering environmental and consumer issues. He is a former deputy editor at Consumer Reports. His work has also appeared in Salon, Car and Driver, Playboy, and Detroit Monthly among other publications. Follow him on Twitter @cliffweathers and on Facebook.

 
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