Media

A Baker's Dozen of AlterNet's Most Popular Articles of 2012

Mormon controversies, food companies run by right-wingers, the science of cannabis and much more.

As I announced a week ago, AlterNet is doing something different for our Fall fundraising campaign. Instead of barraging you with many e-mails pleading for support and giving dire predictions for the future (they may come true, but hopefully not), we are simply going to tell you some stories -- about interesting things, our work, quirky items you might not know -- all in lists to celebrate one of the most effective ways of communicating information (but far from the only one).

 
So here is list #1: a baker's dozen of stories that were most popular on AterNet so far this year.
Maren Stephenson, Salon | Jun 4, 2012
 
4. 5 Food Companies Run by Radical Right-Wingers
Lauren Kelley, AlterNet | Jul 22, 2012 

5. Matt Taibbi Reveals How Romney Made His Fortune -- It Ain't Pretty, and He Shouldn't Be Proud of It
Amy Goodman and Matt Taibbi, Democracy Now | Aug 31, 2012

6. Founding Fathers Whose Skepticism About Christianity Would Make Them Unelectable Today
Rob Boston, AlterNet | Jan 10, 2012

7. The 5 Most Awful Atheists
Ian Murphy, Alternet | Aug 3, 2012 

8. GOP Insider: How Religion Destroyed My Party
Janine Urbaniak, AlterNet | Apr 1, 2011 

10. If Alcohol Were Discovered Today, Would it be Legal?
David Nutt, Cambridge's UTI Press | Sept 6, 2012 

11. 6 Brands Playing Footsie with Conservatives and Paying the Price
Dave Johnson, Alternet | Aug 3, 2012
 
Chris Mooney, AlterNet | Apr 8, 2012 

13. The 11 Dumbest Things Conservatives Have Said About Women
Sarah Seltzer, AlterNet | Feb 28, 2012

So that's it. Pretty interesting, don't you think? It's a diverse list of stories including pot, religion, renegade Republicans, work sanity, consumer awareness, the evil method of Romney's fortune and much more. 

I hope you enjoyed the list. Should you be interested in supporting AlterNet's ongoing work, we would greatly appreciate it.
 
 

 

Don Hazen is the executive editor of AlterNet.