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JFK Assassination: CIA and New York Times Are Still Lying To Us

Fifty years later, a complicit media still covers up for the security state. We need to reclaim our history.

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3. “ Breach of Trust: How the Warren Commission Failed the Nation and Why,” by Gerald McKnight. Written by a professor emeritus of history at Hood College, this is one of the few invaluable books on the Kennedy case produced by American academia – which has been as timid as the press when it comes to exploring this taboo topic. McKnight documents how U.S. security agencies immediately hijacked the Warren investigation — and makes a compelling case for their own involvement in JFK’s death.

4. “ Our Man in Mexico: Winston Scott and the Hidden History of the CIA,” by Jefferson Morley. By focusing on Scott, chief of the CIA station in Mexico City at the time of the JFK assassination, Morley sheds a revealing light on a fascinating sideshow in the Oswald story. Morley demonstrates how Oswald was the object of an intensive CIA shadow play, which can be traced back to the agency’s wizard of deception, James Jesus Angleton.

5. “ Oswald and the CIA,” by John Newman. A former military intelligence officer, Newman brought his unique expertise to deciphering the flood of JFK documents that were declassified in 1992 as a result of the public outcry following Oliver Stone’s film “JFK.” Newman shows that – despite CIA denials – the agency had a strong operational interest in Oswald that dated back years before Dallas.

6. “ Brothers: The Hidden History of the Kennedy Years,” by David Talbot. Yes, I plead guilty to shameless self-promotion. But in my defense, my book broke new ground by documenting how Robert Kennedy himself was one of the first JFK conspiracy theorists. Based on over 150 interviews with Kennedy relatives and administration insiders, the book traces Bobby’s secret search for the truth about his brother’s murder.

7. “ Deep Politics and the Death of JFK,” by Peter Dale Scott. A retired University of California, Berkeley, literature scholar, former Canadian diplomat and distinguished poet, Scott is the Wise Man of the Kennedy research movement. Though not trained as a historian or investigative journalist, Scott took up the challenge of the JFK mystery in his spare time over four decades ago, delving assiduously where few reporters or academics dared go. “Deep Politics” is his Kennedy masterpiece, a meticulously detailed examination of the deep network of power that underlies the events in Dallas. The book is filled with provocative insights about how the upper circles of U.S. power actually operate (often in concert with the criminal underworld). I list “Deep Politics” last, only because it’s not for beginners – readers should approach this dense and challenging book after getting a basic grounding in the Kennedy case.

Websites:

1. JFKFacts

Presided over by Jeff Morley, American journalism’s point man on the Kennedy case, this blog treats the JFK assassination as an ongoing news story, with frequent updates and revelations. Must reading for hardcore JFK enthusiasts, as well as the idly curious.

2. Mary Ferrell Foundation

Named after one of the early JFK citizen investigators, this deep archive of Kennedy documents is an invaluable research treasure. Run by a savvy techie named Rex Bradford, the site features hundreds of thousands of government documents as well as digitized books, video and audio recordings, and a photo library.

3. Citizens for Truth About the Kennedy Assassination

This JFK site grew out of the deep work produced by James DiEugenio and Lisa Pease, two of the more brilliant independent researchers in the Kennedy field. CTKA features work that pushes the envelope and makes intriguing connections before anyone else.