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Man Born Without Penis to Get One Built From Arm Skin

And he boasts that he’s slept with more than 100 women.
 
 
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Andrew Wardle, now 39, was born with an ectopic bladder, which meant it formed outside of his body. Although he had testicles, Wardle had no penis. According to The Sun, Wardle’s mother was horrified by his condition and put him up for adoption. A loving couple from Wales raised him.

After operations, Wardle was able to urinate through a tube. And despite not having a penis, Wardle boasts that he has slept with more than 100 women. He said only once telling a woman turned out poorly, as she responded with punching him in the face.

"Most of the time they didn't seem too bothered - they liked the fact I could pleasure them in other ways and never expected anything in return," he told The Huffington Post UK.

Wardle also said that he could please women in ways that did not involve full sex. He said: "I've done everything you can imagine, apart from full sex. Ladies love me because I've got the gift of the gab and a handsome face.”

Wardle illustrates that not having a penis doesn’t make you any less of a man, and loving relationships can be formed despite the absence of gendered body parts. But, sadly, behind Wardle’s confidence lies a deep struggle with not being able to fully perform his society-constructed gender role.  

In fact, his first girlfriend of four years broke up with him because, he told The Sun, “She wanted to experience things I was just unable to do.” He began taking ecstasy and LSD at the age of 21 to numb the detrimental psychological effects of being a man without a penis in today’s society. He then used the drugs as a “cover” — telling women he wouldn’t be able to get an erection due to his drug use. Wardle said he only told about 20 percent of the women he’s been with about having no penis.

Yet, things got really bad a couple of years ago when he overdosed on pills in an attempted suicide. Wardle then decided to get help and learned that doctors would be able to construct him a penis.

This summer, in a series of three operations, doctors will remove some skin, muscle and nerves from his arm, roll it all onto a tube that will connect to his urethra and attach it to his body. Doctors will also link up his new penis to his testicles, making ejaculation possible. And a pump device will allow him to achieve an erection by forcing blood to flow into his new penis.

Now, Wardle is struggling with a new personal issue: whether or not he wants to be a father. He told The Huffington Post, "I've spent my entire life thinking I would never be able to be a dad — and now with the possibility finally there for me, I don't know if it's something I could come to terms with."

Alyssa Figueroa is an associate editor at AlterNet. 

 
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