Meet the Top Five Worst Polluters

New research reveals which companies are to blame for global warming.

A new study from Climate Accountability Institute has 'named and shamed' at least 90 corporations which it says are responsible for almost two-thirds of global greenhouse gas emissions,The Guardianreported.

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The companies range from investor-owned firms to state-owned and government-run firms with data collected from public records and the US Department of Energy. 

Analyses of the findings confirm that the majority of those responsible are in the business of producing either oil, gas, or coal, with half of the emissions released in the past 25 years.

Climate change experts said the research was the most ambitious so far to hold individual carbon producers responsible, Grist reported. Former Vice President Al Gore welcomed the report and said it was a “crucial step forward."

So, who are the top 5 corporate offenders?

1.     ChevronTexaco  

Unsurprisingly, Chervon Texaco is the top emitter of man-made carbon emissions among investor-owned companies. The multinational energy corporation is active in more than 180 countries and is one of the world’s largest corporations.

2.     ExxonMobil

Oil and gas corporation ExxonMobil comes in close second among investor-owned companies. In the past, ExxonMobil has been accused of downplaying the global warming threat as well as funding groups that refute climate change.

3. Saudi Aramaco

Third place goes to state-owned Saudi Aramco. Owned by Saudi Arabia, Saudi Aramco holds the world’s largest oil field and is estimated to be one of the world’s most valuable companies.

4.     BP

Oil tycoon company BP comes in fourth place. Ironically, the corporation was one of the first to come out and publicly support scientific consensus on climate change.

5.     Gazprom 

Russia’s Gazprom, a state-owned company, rounds out the top five dirtiest polluters. The company is the one of the largest extractors of natural gas. It most recently was the target of an action by Greenpeace activists protesting Russia’s oil drilling in the Arctic.




Jodie Gummow is a senior fellow and staff writer at AlterNet.