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Gray Wolf Returns to Iowa After 89 Years...and Is Shot Dead

Hunter escapes being cited despite wolves being a protected species in the state.
 
 
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Photo Credit: Holly Kuchera / Shutterstock

 
 
 
 

DNA testing has confirmed that an animal shot in February in Iowa's Buchanan County was in fact a wolf, according to the Iowa Department of Natural Resources. This is the first confirmed gray wolf ( Canis lupus) in Iowa since 1925. 

Experts believe the wolf likely traveled south from Wisconsin or Minnesota, the latter of which has the largest wolf population in the lower 48. 

The Iowa wolf, which was a 65-70 pound healthy female, was shot and killed in February of this year by a hunter who claims he mistook it for a coyote. Although wolves remain a protected species in Iowa, the hunter was not cited, because he said he believed the animal to be a coyote and has cooperated with authorities, including bringing the wolf to them in the first place. 

"I was surprised but not that surprised," DNA specialist Vince Evelsizer told  the Gazette. "Large animals can cover great distances, and state lines mean nothing to them." 

After being nearly exterminated across the continental US, gray wolves have returned to many states in the last two decades, both due to reintroductions and populations migrating from Canada. Gray wolves have been confirmed as far west as California and Oregon and as far east as Michigan.

During the same time wolves have been vindicated by science as key ecological species. As top predators, wolves not only manage prey populations of animals such as deer and elk, but also change their behavior, curbing unhindered grazing. The wolf's return to Yellowstone National park  led to a resurgence in young forest and a subsequent explosion in biodiversity

But in many states, wolves are still actively hunted and trapped. A legislative rider  stripped the wolves of protection from the Endangered Species Act in 2011, the only animal ever to lose its protection in this way. 

As of January this year, hunters and trappers have killed 2,567 gray wolves in the US' lower 48 states since 2011. In all, around 6,000 wolves are thought to inhabit the lower 48, up from a nadir of 300 before the gray wolf gained protection in 1974. 

This article is republished with permission of mongabay.com. 

Join the Humane Society of the United States to help protect Michigan's 650 wolves from senseless trophy hunting.

 
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