Economy  
comments_image Comments

Thinking of Trying to Make Money Off Airbnb or Uber? Read This First

The so-called 'sharing economy' is becoming a booming industry for middlemen, but for you, it's complicated.
 
 
Share

Photo Credit: Shutterstock.com

 
 
 
 

Joining the sharing economy as a provider of services – accommodation, transportation or whatever else the market calls for – gives you a chance to make money while being part of a “movement”. It sounds tremendously appealing, doesn’t it?

The companies being built around this new zeitgeist have different enough business models for it to be worth discussing them as if they do, indeed, fall into a different category from more traditional bastions of capitalism. To some, the appeal is the ability to feel like part of a community by pooling their resources: helping a neighbor or network member to cut the cost of everything from a pricey textbook to a baby stroller, or a ride from San Francisco to LA and an overnight stay in someone’s spare room. It’s a far cry from shopping on Amazon, and checking for plane fares on JetBlue and shopping around for hotel bargains on Priceline – somehow more personal.

But make no mistake: it’s a business. And you forget that at your peril, regardless of how you’re participating in the sharing economy.

Here’s the bottom line: none of the businesses that have sprung up to serve the sharing economy are 501c3 non-profit entities. Rather, they are corporations whose goal is to make a profit out of a much less formal sharing economy that already existed. Long before Airbnb was launched in 2008, a friend of mind traveled across Europe using a couch-surfing style network called Servus. I’ve formed some lasting friendships with people with a free Airbnb-style network, Hospitality Club, that offers hosts and guests the chance to review each other, Airbnb style. Airbnb has just formalized those arrangements, while ride-sharing companies like BlaBla Car have done the same with those old-fashioned ride share boards on walls or online – and build in a profit for the middleman.

But you don’t get to become one of the most valuable venture capital-based businesses in the world, as Airbnb has done, and to be worth an estimated $10bn (more than some hotel chains) if all you are is part of a “movement”. Nope, you have to have found a way to make being the middleman pay off very handsomely indeed – and that’s capitalism 101, not a movement.

All of which means that if you’re doing business with Airbnb – or Uber, or Parking Panda, or Liquid, or any of the other sharing economy enterprises springing up – you need to think of it in those terms, too.

First of all, while you may think of this as just generating a bit of extra income on the side – a way to pay off your student loans, to make your summer vacation pay for itself, to fund your weekends out with friends or to help save up to pay for a wedding or a downpayment for your house or car – the IRS won’t see it that way.

And if you think the IRS won’t ever know, well, let me disabuse you of that right now. You’ll fill out tax forms – and come January, you’ll get a 1099 form. Depending on the figure on it, you may end up kissing your expected refund goodbye, or facing an unexpected tax liability. If that 1099 form doesn’t show up? Don’t heave a sigh of relief and fail to report that income. If you think an unexpected tax liability is bad, getting on the wrong side of the IRS is exponentially worse.

The best idea of all is to talk to your accountant and ask for their input. At what point does sharing economy income change your tax picture by putting you in a higher tax bracket? Are there any additional writeoffs you should be aware of? Sure, this might cost you an hour of her time – but it could save you a lot of money down the road. And remember, you’re thinking of this as a business – just like the Airbnbs, Ubers and others who are quite happy to scoop up a percentage of what you collect.