Drugs

This Map Shows You Which Countries Smoke the Most Pot

The Washington Post created a convenient data map based on the United Nations 2014 World Drug Report.

Photo Credit: underworld / Shutterstock.com

These days it seems like everyone in the world smokes weed, am I right? The nation of Uruguay flat-out legalized the herb (and plans to give medical pot to its prisoners), Colorado is making millions in marijuana sales taxes, Washingtonians are packing state-legal bowls right and left. Globally, attitudes surrounding the herb have been relaxing as education about its medical benefits are popularized. People are talking more and more about the negative impacts of the War on Drugs, and cannabis prohibition in particular.

In the U.S. cannabis is the most popular illegal substance and almost half of all Americans have tried it. In case you've ever wondered which countries smoke the most pot, the Washington Post created a convenient data map based on the United Nations 2014 World Drug Report

According to the map, Iceland wins the prize for most stoners per capita with 55,000 pot users total (almost 1/4 of their population). According to the Washington Post, Iceland's president wants to follow in Uruguay's pioneering footsteps and legalize.

“If we allow the sale of alcohol,” he said, “there is no reason to ban the soft drugs any longer.”

In its article describing their data map, the Washington Postincluded a significant caveat: "There are huge swath’s of the globe where there is no data, so it’s difficult to know how much weed is smoked there. For instance, in Southeast Asia, home to the happy pizza, little data is to be had."

What they were able to map is worth a gander, however, so check out the Washington Postdata map "Measuring global cannabis use" below:  

April M. Short is a yoga teacher and writer who previously worked as AlterNet's drugs and health editor. She currently works part-time for AlterNet, and freelances for a number of publications nationwide. 

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