Belief  
comments_image Comments

Pat Robertson Will Cure Your Asthma? 5 Worst Pieces of Health "Advice" Dispensed by the Christian Televangelist

You'd be surprised at the number of common medical conditions caused by demons.
 
 
Share
 
 
 
 
Pat Robertson offers more than spiritual guidance. The rickety televangelist also dispenses relationship advice -- like  telling wives to put out whether they want to or not and  encouraging cousins to marry -- and helpfully shares his medical expertise with viewers. He specializes in demonic ailments. 
 
In a Monday episode of the 700 Club, a woman wrote in with this common complaint, "My son heard sounds that sent painful shockwaves through his body as I was praying for him and I called on the name of JESUS. My son said it felt like something hit him very hard in the stomach. I know this is not of God. He is a Christian. Can Christians be attacked by demons?"
 
As Raw Story's David Edwards points out, rather than recommend that her son see a doctor for his stomach pains, Robertson says, "He can be attacked by demons and he can be oppressed or possessed by demons."
 
Demonic possession is a serious matter demanding immediate attention by trained professionals. "You need to get somebody with you that understands the spiritual dimension and spiritual warfare.... you don't want some quack in there that's casting out nonexistent demons!"  he warns, before getting to the root of the problem (and most other problems): witches.
 
“If I were you, I would look back in your family. What in your family — do you have anybody involved in the occult, somebody in witchcraft or tarot cards or psychic things?”
 
Pat Robertson actually gives out wildly irresponsible health advice with some regularity. Many of his recommendations involve activity -- like watching the 700 Club -- that happens to benefit Pat Robertson.  Here are 5 other examples:
 
 
The 700 Club shared an inspirational tale of a woman who claimed that watching the show made her asthma disappear. Now she doesn't even have an inhaler, she gushes in her email. Robertson does not trouble himself to point out that perhaps an inhaler might be a good back-up plan, in case he is too busy yelling about gays, Muslims, Obama, scientists and women to devote the needed time to asthma sufferers. 
 
2. Praying will cure deafness
 
Part of being a good mom is channeling the force of God in order to cure your children of incurable medical conditions. A 700 Club caller recently failed on that front, telling Robertson that despite her prayers her son remained deaf. Robertson was not about to let this prayer miscreant off the hook. After all, he cures deafness all the time:

“I have dealt with people who are deaf and you rebuke the spirit of deafness and they get healed,” Robertson said. “I don’t know what you’re doing wrong.” 

“Why don’t you try that and if it doesn’t work, try something else,” he said.

3. Headaches
 
Robertson says that chronic headaches are likely due to stress and fatigue, but may suggest a more serious underlying medical condition.  Just kidding, they're caused by demons.
 
4. Praying will cure death
 
You would think that death would pose a challenge to the power of prayer, but not according to Robertson, who relays the story of a surgeon at Regents University -- a Christian College founded by Robertson in 1978 -- raising a man from the dead by praying really hard. "All of the sudden he began to shake and the power of God hit him and he came back to life," Robertson says.
 
5. Do NOT ask Pat Robertson and God to grow back your missing limbs!
 
Sadly there are some limits to Pat Robertson's power. Last year, Robertson got testy when a caller criticized the televangelist for not praying for people who are missing limbs. An agitated Robertson replied that God is pretty busy and cannot be expected to give out gifts “like Santa Claus.”
 
“It’s a different level of faith,” Robertson said. “Don’t sit on your couch and give us grief because we’re not praying for legs to grow for Heaven’s sakes. If we can ask God to heal your cancer, thank Him for that, please.” 
 
Tana Ganeva is AlterNet's managing editor. Follow her on Twitter or email her at tana@alternet.org.
 
See more stories tagged with: